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I'm new to CSS and I'm trying to understand how to fix the following line from not working for top and bottom margins. It works for side margins just fine, however:

.contents {
    ...
    margin: 10px 10px 10px 10px;
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/LCTeU/

How do I fix this?

Edit:

I've also tried padding the container instead, and that just expands the container to maximum size (why?):

.container {
    ...
    padding: 10px 10px 10px 10px;
}
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I think you might be confusing margins with padding. Padding is on the inside, margins are on the outside. See - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/padding –  Jez May 10 '13 at 15:36
    
The fiddle you provided does not collapse the margins –  Kevin Bowersox May 10 '13 at 15:37
    
More tips: CSS comments start with /* and end with */. –  Rob W May 10 '13 at 15:38
    
Quick tip, margin: 10px 10px 10px 10px; = margin: 10px; –  j08691 May 10 '13 at 15:38
1  
@KevinBowersox That fiddle does collapse margins. The <h2> and <article> margins are collapsed. This is how the OP wanted it to look like: jsfiddle.net/LCTeU/2 (note: I added overflow:hidden to <article> to achieve this effect, another method would be adding border: 1px solid transparent;, both have side effects). –  Rob W May 10 '13 at 15:38
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This answer is based off of the fiddle you provided.

I think your approach is incorrect in that your applying a margin to the article to space it within the parent div tag. It is better to use padding in this case, since your attempting to separate the content from its outside border. So apply:

article {
  //display: block;
  clear: both;
  padding: 10px;
}

This will cause the article tags to increase in size, however the borders of the container div elements will now be touching. To create space between elements a margin is applied.

.rounded-box {
  background-color: #959392;
  border-radius: 15px;
  margin: 10px 0px;
}

Working Example http://jsfiddle.net/LCTeU/4/

So just to recap, when you want to create space between two elements use margin. When you want to create space between an element and its border (or you want an element to be surrounded by whitespace) use padding.

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Wonderful answer. Thank you so much! Can you explain one more thing please? Why do the div elements touch when padding is added? –  Mike Holler May 10 '13 at 17:05
    
Because no margin was supplied. In your first example this would have occurred, however you specified clear:both on the article. See jsfiddle.net/LCTeU/5 which removes the clear –  Kevin Bowersox May 10 '13 at 17:09
    
Disregard the thing about clear, its because there were no margins to separate the elements. –  Kevin Bowersox May 10 '13 at 17:22
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Use overflow:auto on any of the elements that are involved with the collapse. For example:

article {
    overflow:auto;
}

jsFiddle example

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How does this answer compare to the answer @KevinBowersox gives above? This is fewer lines, but it seems better to me to specify margin and padding, than it does to use the overflow property, since it's not immediately clear to me how this works. –  Mike Holler May 10 '13 at 18:18
1  
Sorry that I didn't explain further. The way this works has to do with the block formatting context. See colinaarts.com/articles/the-magic-of-overflow-hidden and developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/Block_formatting_context. –  j08691 May 10 '13 at 18:23
    
Thank you! This is what I was looking for. –  Mike Holler May 10 '13 at 19:27
    
You are my hero! –  Dmitriy Yurchenko Dec 19 '13 at 22:18
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