Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a program in which I use an if statement to check some condition; if true I increment a counter. The problem is that as soon as the statement is true the variable either gets incremented endlessly or by random number.

I have been trying to use some clause to break out of this statement if condition meet but with no luck

my code:

if(res_vect_angle >=60 && res_vect_angle <=100 && left_mag_b >100)
{

  //line(drawing, *iter_s, *(iter_s -1),  Scalar( 255, 255, 255 ), 2,8 );
  left_hook_count++;
  cout<<"Left Hook:..........................!!! "<<left_hook_count<<endl;

  if(left_hook_count++ == true)
  {
    break;
  }
}

The whole chunk of code associated with the issue:

float M1, M2;
float A1, A2;
double left_mag_a, left_mag_b;
double res_vect_angle;

int i = 0;

    for(vector<Point>::iterator iter_lh = Leftarm.begin(); iter_lh != Leftarm.end(); ++iter_lh)     
    {       
        if(iter_lh->y <=240 && iter_lh->y >=60 && iter_lh->x >=340 && iter_lh->x <=680)
        {
            left_detect.push_back(*iter_lh);

            if(i % 4 == 0)
            {
                if(left_detect.size()>4)
                    {
                        for(vector<Point>::iterator iter_s = left_detect.begin()+3; iter_s != left_detect.end(); ++iter_s, i++)
                        {
                            //Resultant Magnetude
                            M1 = pow((double) iter_s->x + (iter_s -2)->x,2);
                            M2 = pow((double) iter_s->y + (iter_s -2)->y,2);

                            left_mag_a = (M1 + M2);

                            left_mag_b = sqrt(left_mag_a);

                            //Resultant Angle
                            A1 = abs(iter_s->x - (iter_s -2)->x);
                            A2 = abs(iter_s->y - (iter_s -2)->y);

                            res_vect_angle = abs(atan2(A1,A2) * 180 /PI);
                            //cout<<"LEFT HOOK ANGLE IS: "<<res_vect_angle<<endl;                           




                            if(res_vect_angle >=60 && res_vect_angle <=100 && left_mag_b >100)
                            {

                                //line(drawing, *iter_s, *(iter_s -1),  Scalar( 255, 255, 255 ), 2,8 );
                                left_hook_count++;
                                cout<<"Left Hook:..........................!!! "<<left_hook_count<<endl;

                                if(left_hook_count++ == true)
                                {
                                    break;
                                }
                            }




                        }

                    }
            }
        }

    }

Hope this helps guys ps. left_hook_count++; is a int variable declared on top of my main().

share|improve this question
    
where is left_hook_count initialized ? – Arthur May 10 '13 at 15:58
2  
endlessly ? do you have a loop somewhere ? can you post that code too ? – A4L May 10 '13 at 16:03
1  
What is left_hook_count's type? If it is not a boolean type, comparing it to true checks whether it's equal to 1, not whether it's unequal to 0. So if its value is 2, there is nothing to break out of the loop. – hvd May 10 '13 at 16:03
1  
Whoah, what's going on here? You're comparing left_hook_count against true and then incrementing it? You do realize that any non-zero value in C++ evaluates to true? I would compare it against an absolute value, such as 1 or 5 or even ! == 0 at least for clarity's sake if nothing else. – Frecklefoot May 10 '13 at 16:04
1  
There is seldom any need to compare booleans: you will get another boolean! Do not say x == true, say just x; do not say x == false, say just !x. The other forms, x != true or x != false, are left as an exercise to the reader. – rodrigo May 10 '13 at 16:08

The best solution is probably to invert the test, and make all the rest of the outer if conditional:

if (whatever) {
    // do some stuff
    if (left_hook_count != true) { // or whatever the test should really be
        // do some more stuff
    }
}

You could get the program flow you want using goto with a label after the outer if, but you don't want to.

On the other hand, it sounds like perhaps this is in a loop, and you don't want to enter the if block at all if the counter has been incremented? In that case you want:

if (left_hook_count == 0 && whatever) {
    // do some stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
But you don't want to use a goto: xkcd.com/292 – ALOToverflow May 10 '13 at 16:03
    
@ALOToverflow: Thanks, that's just what I was searching for. – Mike Seymour May 10 '13 at 16:04
    
that argument against goto was just poor ;-) – Walter May 10 '13 at 16:10
    
@Walter: Indeed, that's a fairly unlikely consequence of using it. The best argument for not using it is that if you don't use it, you won't need to argue about why you used it. – Mike Seymour May 10 '13 at 16:14
    
xkcd always gets a +1... – Michael Dorgan May 10 '13 at 18:39

you could provide more details so that we can figure out whats happening.

You might not have initialized it? and checking again

if(left_hook_count++ == true) 

it will increment it again unneccessariy and for for first count (0 : it wont happen)

i guess you 're using some recursive function. so check for Break condition (all test cases too).

share|improve this answer

Don't compare left_hook_count++ to true. In this context, true is equal to 1, and once left_hook_count exceeds 1, this test will fail and the code will never hit the break.

And you don't break out of an if statement. You break out of a loop; a break in an if statement inside the loop is one way of doing this.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your replay.....How would you implement your solution to my code....? Regards – Tomazi May 10 '13 at 16:14
    
@Tomazi - I have no idea what your actual loop termination condition is, and I have no intention of wading through all that code to try to figure it out. It's obvious that the current test doesn't make sense. Beyond that, you have to state clearly what conditions should terminate the loop, and then write code that does that. – Pete Becker May 10 '13 at 16:16

You can just negate the condition, instead of trying to break out of the if:

if(...) {
   if(!left_hook_count++) {
      // Do what you need to do
   }
}
share|improve this answer

my new answer:

:mylabel if (some_condition)
{
  //code
  if (some_condition) {break mylabel;}
  //code
}

my old answer: Replace the if statement with a while statement containing a unconditional break at the end. (old answer was before I learned of attaching labels to statement blocks.)

In your case:

while(res_vect_angle >=60 && res_vect_angle <=100 && left_mag_b >100)
{

    //line(drawing, *iter_s, *(iter_s -1),  Scalar( 255, 255, 255 ), 2,8 );
    left_hook_count++;
    cout<<"Left Hook:..........................!!! "<<left_hook_count<<endl;

    if(left_hook_count++ == true)
    {
        break;
    }
    break; //this unconditional break makes the while loop act as an if statement
}

However if you don't have code after the conditional break what's the point of having it? I'm assuming you've omitted that code? The way you wrote it it would simply break out of the inner for loop.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.