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I came across this declaration in KN King's book on Page 269

int a[ROWS][COLS], (*p)[COLS];

p = &a[0];

p now points to the first row of 2-d array. I understand why a[0] points to first row of 2-d array. But I do not understand the syntax for declaring p. What does that mean and how do I remember it?

What are the parens around *p doing ? (*p) what does this syntax mean in terms of operator precedence?

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simple its a pointer to an array of cols elements of type int. rip it out and analyze like *p(a pointer) then an array declaration (*p)[] then each element type int. the array size is cols. now since edit parn arount p guards it to be declared as pointer to somethin rather than array of int pointers. –  Koushik May 10 '13 at 16:01
    
The parentheses are because otherwise the [] binds before the *. int *p[COLS] is an array of pointers, int (*p)[COLS] is a pointer to an array. –  Carl Norum May 10 '13 at 16:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

> "But I do not understand the syntax for declaring p"

So p is declared as:

int (*p)[COLS];

It's a pointer to an array of ints which is COLS in size.

> "What does that mean and how do I remember it?"

Here's how you can tell, use the spiral rule and start by working in the ()s:

    ( p)                    p 
    (*p)                    p is a pointer
    (*p)[    ]              p is a pointer to an array
int (*p)[    ]              p is a pointer to an array of ints
int (*p)[COLS]              p is a pointer to an array of ints of size COLS

Of course you could always cheat to get the answer too:

enter image description here

> "what does this syntax mean in terms of operator precedence?"

In the C Language, [] has precedence over the unary *, that means you need the () in order for p to be a pointer to an array of ints, instead of an array of pointers to ints.

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2  
+1 It deserves it. –  Luv May 10 '13 at 16:51
    
@Luv +1 to your comment because it deserves it too! –  abc May 11 '13 at 0:27

Both postfix [] and () operators have higher precedence than the unary * operator, so they bind first. IOW, T *p[N] is interpreted as T *(p[N]); p is an array of pointers to T. In order to declare a pointer to an array (or pointer to a function), you have to use parentheses to force the * operator to bind before the []:

T *p[N];     // p is an array of pointer to T
T (*p)[N];   // p is a pointer to an array of T

T *f();      // f is a function returning pointer to T
T (*f)();    // f is a pointer to a function returning T
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ignore the comma and re-write as:

int a[ROWS][COLS];
int (*p)[COLS];

p = &a[0];

p is a pointer to an array of ints COLS big the declaration doesn't allocate that much memory, but it does allow some bounds checking. The memory for the array was allocated in the declaration of:
a => int a[ROWS][COLS];

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It is the first time I see a pointer declared like that. So, if p is incremented by 1 it will now be pointing to the first element of the second row? –  user1222021 May 10 '13 at 16:03
    
Yes, that's correct. –  Carl Norum May 10 '13 at 16:05
    
@CarlNorum Can you describe the syntax to me or point me to a reference please? –  abc May 10 '13 at 16:06
    
@CarlNorum Thanks! Learned something new today! =) –  user1222021 May 10 '13 at 16:06
1  
It's a normal C pointer-to-array. Check out a beginner book or tutorial, I guess? You may find the cdecl tool helpful. –  Carl Norum May 10 '13 at 16:07

I understand why a[0] points to first row of 2-d array

This is already inaccurate. In value context, a[0] does not really point "to the first row of 2D array". a[0] actually points to the first element of the first row of 2D array. In other words, in value context a[0] is a pointer to a[0][0]. The type of a[0] decays to int *, as you probably know. And sizeof *a[0] is equal to sizeof(int). So, it doesn't really point to the entire row. It points to a lone int object.

Now, if you really want to point to the first row of a 2D array, i.e. point to the entire row, you need &a[0]. That will give you a pointer of type int (*)[COLS]. Note that sizeof *&a[0] is equal to sizeof (int[COLS]), so it is truly a pointer to the first row of a 2D array. This is what you see in your example.

Note that numerically a[0] and &a[0] (as pointers in value context) are the same, since they are pointing to the same spot in linear memory. However, type-wise &a[0] points to the entire row, while a[0] points to a single element.

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Excellent answer!! :) –  Sumit Trehan Sep 13 at 6:04

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