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Someone know how can I randomize all the data inside my dataframe? I mean, I would get a new data frame where data are permuted by rows and by columns, to obtain an aleatory new data frame with the same numbers that I have in the first.

Something like this:

Thanks!

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

It would be a lot faster to do this on a matrix:

dm <- matrix(1:25, ncol = 5); dm
dm[] <- sample(dm); dm

Edit: This is wrong: "I'm pretty sure that permuting first on columns and then on rows should give you the same result as permuting the entire vector and then reshaping to the original dimensions." <\s>

The "Simpson method" would give different results and may be what was requested (but it will be faster with a matrix testbed if this it to be done as part of a simulation effort):

 dm <- dm[ sample(nrow(dm)), sample( ncol(dm)) ]
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+1 for you!! I always forget about the power of [] in these situations. – Jilber May 10 '13 at 17:07
    
This was my solution in the comments.... teach me not to post as an answer :-( (even if it's the wrong answer - at least in @Gavin's example it's clearly NOT a full randomized sequence, as I noted there) – Carl Witthoft May 10 '13 at 17:11
    
I'm going to leave it. It's not exactly clear what the OP wanted. I do agree that permutation within a column followed by permutation of the columns en_bloc will give a different result. – 42- May 10 '13 at 17:15
    
+1 that's pretty nifty – Matthew Plourde May 10 '13 at 17:27
    
thank you very much – BioYupi May 24 '13 at 10:23

Just use sample() separately on the number of rows and number of columns and then index with the results from sample().

df <- data.frame(matrix(1:25, ncol = 5))

permDF <- function(x) {
  nr <- nrow(x)
  nc <- ncol(x)
  df[sample(nr), sample(nc)]
}

> permDF(df)
  X3 X4 X2 X1 X5
4 14 19  9  4 24
5 15 20 10  5 25
1 11 16  6  1 21
3 13 18  8  3 23
2 12 17  7  2 22
> permDF(df)
  X1 X2 X4 X3 X5
2  2  7 17 12 22
4  4  9 19 14 24
1  1  6 16 11 21
3  3  8 18 13 23
5  5 10 20 15 25

Note that this keeps values in rows and columns together but the columns and rows are in a different order. If you want the data set fully randomised then there isn't a really simple way with a data frame. I would do this using a matrix but it requires a bit more work, as @DWin shows

mat <- matrix(1:25, ncol = 5)
pmat <- mat
set.seed(42)
pmat[] <- mat[sample(length(mat))]
pmat

> pmat
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]   23   11   24   10    5
[2,]   25   21   20    9    8
[3,]    7    3   13    1   18
[4,]   19   12    4   16    2
[5,]   14   17    6   15   22

You can do what I was doing with the data frame in the same way with the matrix using slightly different indexing to the one above

mat[sample(nrow(mat)), sample(ncol(mat))]

> set.seed(42)
> mat[sample(nrow(mat)), sample(ncol(mat))]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]   15   25    5   10   20
[2,]   14   24    4    9   19
[3,]   11   21    1    6   16
[4,]   12   22    2    7   17
[5,]   13   23    3    8   18
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+1. I had the exact same answer lined up to go, even down to the function name! You gotta be quick around here. – Simon O'Hanlon May 10 '13 at 17:04
    
@SimonO101 by now you should know to just "Wait for it" . (xkcd/1190). Meanwhile, I was just going to suggest sample(as.matrix(df),prod(dim(df)) ) but Gavin's method has the minor advantage of returning a dataframe. – Carl Witthoft May 10 '13 at 17:06
1  
Wait a minute: Gavin's function does exactly what the OP asked for, while my sneaky code will scramble things differently. Note that permDF keeps all elements of a row together, albeit in a different row and in a different order. So it depends on just "how random" you want your result to be. – Carl Witthoft May 10 '13 at 17:10
    
Looking at your results, I am doubting my claim that permuting first within a column and then block permuting those results would give the same as a 'full' permutation. – 42- May 10 '13 at 17:12
    
@DWin yes, This just shuffles the rows and the columns but keep elements in rows and columns together. If you need if fully randomised then your way is the way I would do it - I even started writing an edit to that effect. I'll add a not to explain this. – Gavin Simpson May 10 '13 at 17:26

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