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I have an interface which is common to Class A, B and C. But now I need to add two methods which is only applicable for Class B and not applicable for classes A & C. So, do I need to add these two methods to the common interface itself and throw not implemented exception in class A & C or is there any better way to do this?

interface ICommon
{
   Method1;
   Method2;
   Method3;
   Method4;
}

Class A: ICommon
{
   Method1;
   Method2;
}

Class B: ICommon
{
   Method1;
   Method2;
   Method3;
   Method4;
}

Class C: ICommon
{
   Method1;
   Method2;
}

Thanks in advance

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1  
Why can't you just implement them on class B without them being part of the interface? Put another way - why do you want these methods on the interface? –  Oded May 10 '13 at 17:15
    
I second @Oded there may be a mistake in the way you are modelling things. –  gideon May 10 '13 at 17:18
    
Intially we were having only two methods across all classes A, B & C. But now only we have got this requirement which is only applicable for class B. Also, I can implement this only on class B but the client app is referring to the ICommon interface which is created by a factory class. –  user972255 May 10 '13 at 17:23
    
If the client app is referring to the ICommon interface and it can't be changed, then yes, you have to include the 2 methods in the interface and raise a NotImplementedException when used with class B. If the client app can be modified, then using 2 interfaces as suggested by @steaks is the best approach. –  rivarolle May 10 '13 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If these methods are common to other classes (not just B):

Have B extend another interface

interface ICommon2
{
    Method3;
    Method4;
}

class B : ICommon, ICommon2
{
    Method1;
    Method2;
    Method3;
    Method4;
}

If these methods are specific to only B:

class B : ICommon
{
    Method1;
    Method2;
    Method3;
    Method4;
}
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4  
Depending on the circumstances it might also be a good idea to have ICommon2 inherit from ICommon. –  Jeremy Todd May 10 '13 at 17:18
    
It can be. But it is not in this case because @user972255 does not want Method3 and Method4 to be in classes A or B –  Steven Wexler May 10 '13 at 17:21
    
what @jeremy-todd is saying is that instead of B inheriting from two interfaces, an option is to have the second interface inherit the first so B only would have to inherit from ICommon2. It would still accomplish the same thing as your code. As jeremy said, it depends on what your interfaces and classes represent. –  Tombala May 10 '13 at 17:25
    
Ahh, right. I read it as ICommon : ICommon2...oops! That makes sense +1. –  Steven Wexler May 10 '13 at 17:27
    
@steaks: If I have another interface (ICommon2) then in the client app which is now referring to ICommon interface how we refer to these new methods in ICommon2? –  user972255 May 10 '13 at 17:30

If your interface has the methods, you simply MUST implement them, but you can do it secretly:

Class A: ICommon
{
   public void Method1() 
   {
   }

   public void Method2() 
   {
   }

   void ICommon.Method3() 
   {
       throw new NotSupportedException();
   }

   void ICommon.Method4() 
   {
       throw new NotSupportedException();
   }
}

This is exactly how an array implemments the IList interface and hides members like Add.

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I don't think @user972255 is required to have Method3 and Method4 on the interface because he asks "do I need to add these two methods to the common interface." But the explanation of how you can "hide" methods with explicit interface implementation is helpful. +1 –  Steven Wexler May 10 '13 at 17:43
    
@Steaks: I know there are different ways to look at this "problem". Since you give a very good answer, I offered this different approach which might not help the OP, but maybe others. –  Martin Mulder May 10 '13 at 17:46
    
Completely agree! That's what I was trying to say in my comment and is why I upvoted your answer. –  Steven Wexler May 10 '13 at 17:48
    
@Steaks: Thanks! :) –  Martin Mulder May 10 '13 at 17:50

If two classes have to implement the same interface but one of the classes needs more methods than the interface contains, those methods do not belong in that interface. Otherwise the other class would also need those methods.

Interfaces describe behaviour, like IDisposable dictates a Dispose() method. If your Method3() and Method4() implement certain behaviour, you should extract an interface from those two methods only and apply that interface to classes that need those methods.

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