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I've been writing Android applications for some years and now I'm developing a Windows Store/Windows 8 application.

I'm very confused about how to write different screen layouts for landscape and portrait orientations.

In Android, all we must do is to write 2 layouts, one for portrait and another for landscape, following some name conventions for the file names, and when we rotate the device the platform changes the screen layout automatically.

I've been googling for some solution to do the same in my Windows 8 application, and all I've found was a solution using Visual State Groups and Visual States, putting in the same XAML some modifications that happen to our widgets when we rotate the device.

For example, to make a textblock change its position when I rotate the device to portrait orientation:

<VisualState x:Name="FullScreenPortrait" >
    <Storyboard>
        <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames Storyboard.TargetProperty="(Grid.ColumnSpan)" Storyboard.TargetName="GridViewTitle">
            <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0">
                <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
                    <x:Int32>3</x:Int32>
                </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
            </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame>
        </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
        <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames Storyboard.TargetProperty="(FrameworkElement.Margin)" Storyboard.TargetName="GridViewTitle">
            <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0">
                <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
                    <Thickness>0,10,10,807</Thickness>
                </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame.Value>
            </DiscreteObjectKeyFrame>
        </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
    </Storyboard>
</VisualState>

It doesn't look very clean and simple to me, and even doing that using the Visual Studio's approach of dragging and dropping widgets to generate code I have the impression that there must be some easier and cleaner solution than what I'm doing.

So my question is: is there any easier solution to write XAML layouts for each orientation or am I going the right, but hard way?

Thanks!

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way to handle different orientations is to create two Grid elements with their children inside and change Grids' visibilities according to orientation.

To detect orientation changes, you can also use SimpleOrientation sensor like the code below:

    public sealed partial class MainPage : Page
    {
        private SimpleOrientationSensor _oSensor;

        public MainPage()
        {
            this.InitializeComponent();

            _oSensor = SimpleOrientationSensor.GetDefault();

        }

        protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
        {
            if (_oSensor != null)
                _oSensor.OrientationChanged += (s, a) =>
                {
                    Dispatcher.RunAsync(Windows.UI.Core.CoreDispatcherPriority.Normal, () =>
                    {
                        switch (a.Orientation)
                        {
                            case SimpleOrientation.NotRotated:
                            case SimpleOrientation.Rotated180DegreesCounterclockwise:
                                currentOrientation.Text = "Landscape";
                                break;
                            case SimpleOrientation.Rotated270DegreesCounterclockwise:
                            case SimpleOrientation.Rotated90DegreesCounterclockwise:
                                currentOrientation.Text = "Portrait";
                                break;
                            default:
                                currentOrientation.Text = "N/A";
                                break;
                        }
                    });
                };
        }

    }

Or the easiest way is to handle SizeChanged event like the code below:

public sealed partial class MainPage : Page
{
    public MainPage()
    {
        this.InitializeComponent();

        mainGrid.SizeChanged += mainGrid_SizeChanged;
    }

    void mainGrid_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (mainGrid.ActualHeight > mainGrid.ActualWidth)
            currentOrientation.Text = "Portrait";
        else
            currentOrientation.Text = "Landscape";
    }

}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. That sounds good, but in my code, where I have to handle the selected content of some gridviews, I should do something like if (portrait) { handle_my_gridview_portrait(); } else { handle_my_gridview_landscape(); }. Anyway, it's better than my current solution. Thanks! –  Esdras Beleza May 10 '13 at 20:38
    
The samples above are just showing how you can detect orientation change differently. However, you can change value in the DataContext and use Binding to avoid code-behind as well. –  kimsk May 10 '13 at 21:45
    
Both answers to this questions were good, but yours was more adequate to my problem. Thanks and sorry for the delay! –  Esdras Beleza Jun 6 '13 at 14:13
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Esdras - you're not wrong, there should probably be an easier way but the only other option is the software Expression Blend. And I will concede there isa learning curve to get up and running.

Also for orientation changes written in Xaml, the parent control must drive from a control that can be extend (not internal sealed) and must be layout aware. So for instance if you put a textbox on a layout aware page its orientation will change, but if you put a grid on the Layout aware page and a text box in the grid... The default behavior is that the grid will respond but the textbox will not.

You may also notice that although it's messy and every control needs a control modifier like you ve provided for each element that should respond to orientation change...The benefit is that it requires no native code to define the state or transition and so designers are able to use the xml look alike called xaml to describe the changes in the view whether it be orientation or the states of other controls.

If you can get your hands on the program Expression Blend it was made for that purpose.

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2  
A quick add here: Since the context here is Windows 8, Blend is already "in the box" with Visual Studio 2012 –  Jim O'Neil May 13 '13 at 5:15
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I have written a post on stackoverflow some time back, that might be useful for you. Provided with some example and code:

[Handling Orientation on Windows 8 apps][1]Handling Orientation in Windows 8.1 Store app

Post me, if you have more issues.

Thanks, Ambuj

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Also refer this Article: Quickstart: Screen orientation for Windows –  Ambuj May 19 at 6:46
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