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I have some textboxes on a page and I want to click a link when the user presses enter in any of them.

I can easily trap the enter button using javascript (by looking for 13 in event.keyCode and event.which), but I hit an issue when the browser's autocomplete feature kicks in and suggests what the user might want to type. We're finding the users often press enter to accept the browser's suggestion, rather than tab. This confuses the users as the link is clicked immediately, whereas they still intended to enter text into some of the other fields.

I know it would be better to use a form and a submit button here, but for various reasons that's not practical.

I'm using jQuery, so feel free to offer jQuery solutions.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

User always have to press the down key if they choose to select one of the auto complete text right, why not set a variable to something when they press the down key, and then if they do the enter press afterwards you check the variable. You should not do the link click function if the variable is set, otherwise do it as normal.

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Wow - this is pretty Heath Robinson, but I like it! I guess I'll have to track other keystrokes (up/ down/ page up/ page down as they navigate the list; anything else to return to typing), and set/ reset the flag appropriately. I feel a jQuery extension coming on... –  teedyay Oct 30 '09 at 11:32
    
let me know when the plugin comes out please, it sounds like a whole lot of key press tracking to do:D, gud luck –  tuanvt Oct 30 '09 at 11:37
    
This is a good idea. Remember that the user might press the "up" key in between pressing the "down" and "enter" keys. –  Premasagar Oct 30 '09 at 11:58
    
@tuanvt - it wasn't too bad, as it turns out! I've put the code in another answer to this question, but I'll leave yours as the accepted one as you did the hard work really. Hope you find it useful! –  teedyay Nov 18 '09 at 12:02
    
This assumes that the user selects an automplete option with a keyboard and not, for example, a mouse. –  twernt Aug 24 '11 at 17:12

Using tuanvt's idea in the accepted answer, I wrote a jQuery plugin that does the job.

I track when the user presses the up, down, page-up and page-down keys to tell when they're in the autocomplete box. All other keys imply they've left it.

I ensure that we only apply these rules to textboxes: all other input elements behave normally.

Opera already does a pretty good job of what I was trying to achieve, so I don't enforce my rules in that browser - otherwise the user would have to press enter twice.

Tested in IE6, IE7, IE8, Firefox 3.5.5, Google Chrome 3.0, Safari 4.0.4, Opera 10.00.

It's available on jquery.com as the SafeEnter plugin. For your convenience, the code for release 1.0 is as follows:

// jQuery plugin: SafeEnter 1.0
// http://plugins.jquery.com/project/SafeEnter
// by teedyay
//
// Fires an event when the user presses Enter, but not whilst they're in the browser's autocomplete suggestions

//codesnippet:2e23681e-c3a9-46ce-be93-48cc3aba2c73
(function($)
{
    $.fn.listenForEnter = function()
    {
        return this.each(function()
        {
            $(this).focus(function()
            {
                $(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete', false);
            });
            $(this).keypress(function(e)
            {
                var key = (e.keyCode ? e.keyCode : e.which);
                switch (key)
                {
                    case 13:
                        // Fire the event if:
                        //   - we're not currently in the browser's Autocomplete, or
                        //   - this isn't a textbox, or
                        //   - this is Opera (which provides its own protection)
                        if (!$(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete') || !$(this).is('input[type=text]') || $.browser.opera)
                        {
                            $(this).trigger('pressedEnter', e);
                        }
                        $(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete', false);
                        break;

                    case 40:
                    case 38:
                    case 34:
                    case 33:
                        // down=40,up=38,pgdn=34,pgup=33
                        $(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete', true);
                        break;

                    default:
                        $(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete', false);
                        break;
                }
            });
        });
    };

    $.fn.clickOnEnter = function(target)
    {
        return this.each(function()
        {
            $(this)
                .listenForEnter()
                .bind('pressedEnter', function()
                {
                    $(target).click();
                });
        });
    };
})(jQuery);
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You can no longer get this plugin from jquery due to the change the new plugin site but I noticed you had put V1.0.1 on it (even though we can access it) what was the changes for this and could you post it? :) Thanks –  GazB Jun 10 '13 at 9:58
    
For anyone trying to get this working with the newest version of jQuery (1.9+ I think it is) the .browser as gone but I can't see any autocomplete on Opera anyway so just remove the last check from this line: if (!$(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete') || !$(this).is('input[type=text]') || $.browser.opera) so it reads: if (!$(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete') || !$(this).is('input[type=text]')) –  GazB Jun 10 '13 at 14:09

Try setting the autocomplete off on your check box, though this is not standard for all browser but it works on the common browsers.

<input type="text" autocomplete="off" />
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1  
It would be a shame to lose the autocomplete function altogether. –  teedyay Oct 30 '09 at 10:57

JQuery is nice and all but why not use simple JavaScript?

function submit_on_enter(e) {
    var keycode;
    if (window.event) keycode = window.event.keyCode;
    else if (e) keycode = (e.keyCode ? e.keyCode : e.which);
    else return true;

    if (keycode == 13) {
        if (window.previousKeyCode) {
            // down=40,up=38,pgdn=34,pgup=33
            if (window.previousKeyCode == 33 || window.previousKeyCode == 34 ||
                window.previousKeyCode == 39 || window.previousKeyCode == 40) {
                    window.previousKeyCode = keycode;
                    return true;
            }
        }
        submit_form();
        return false;
    } else {
        window.previousKeyCode = keycode;
        return true;
    }
}
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track down enter key on keyup event, selection is completed by the time you detect enter key on keyup event.

detecting enter key on keydown and do operation interfere with autocomplete functionality.

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If you're using the new html5 form field types, you may wish to alter teedyay's code as follows:

case 13:
                    // Fire the event if:
                    //   - we're not currently in the browser's Autocomplete, or
                    //   - this isn't a textbox, or
                    //   - this is Opera (which provides its own protection)
                    if (!$(this).data('safeEnter_InAutocomplete') || !$(this).is('input([type=text],[type=email],[type=number],[type=search],[type=tel],[type=url])') || $.browser.opera)
                    {
                        ...

Note the new input types.

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This works for me:

$('input').keypress(function(e) {
    if(e.which == 13) {
        if(this.value)
        {
            $("#submitbutton").click();
        }
    }
});
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I'm not sure if you are trapping key presses on the window, or on specific DOM elements. You should do the latter (e.g. on the form element), then in your event handler, look into the event object to determine which DOM element was the origin of the event. If this was a text field with autocomplete, then return false;.

Take a look at jQuery's .keypress() event handler, and the event.target property of the event object.

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Having found the text input that had the focus when the user pressed enter, how do I determine whether or not the browser's autocomplete was being used at the time? –  teedyay Oct 30 '09 at 11:24
    
I'm guessing that it isn't an option for you to treat any text fields that is relevant for the auto-complete as not being relevant for submitting the form? If not, then you could combine this approach with @tuanvt's suggestion of trapping the order of keypresses, to determine when a "down" arrow (potentially followed by an "up" arrow) was pressed. –  Premasagar Oct 30 '09 at 11:57
    
Either way, targetting the form and not the window would be a good idea, since this reduces the chance of conflicts in later development. –  Premasagar Oct 30 '09 at 11:59
    
Hi, whoever down-voted this suggestion. Care to share why you found it unhelpful? –  Premasagar Oct 30 '09 at 14:36
    
I down-voted. I want to know how to detect if the user is in the browser's autocomplete suggestion at the point they press enter: your answer gives me no help in how to do this. Your answer tells me how to find which element the user is in when they press enter, then says "If this was a text field with autocomplete...", but doesn't tell me how to find this information, which is what my question is all about. –  teedyay Nov 18 '09 at 11:37

I faced the same issue and while not perfect I used another approach which I consider simpler. When creating the autocomplete I set the current time for the select event and then compare it before taking any actions:

$('#completer').autocomplete({
  source: ['First', 'Last'], delay: 0, minLength: 0,
  select: function(ev, ui) {
    $(ev.target).data('lastAutocompleteSelectTimestamp', new Date().getTime())
  }
})

$(document).on('keydown', '#completer', function(ev){
  if (ev.which != 13) return
  var lastAutocompletionTime = $(ev.currentTarget).data('lastAutocompleteSelectTimestamp')
  if (!lastAutocompletionTime || (new Date().getTime() - lastAutocompletionTime) > 100)
    alert('Enter pressed outside autocomplete context')
})
<html>
<head>
  <link href="https://code.jquery.com/ui/1.11.0/themes/smoothness/jquery-ui.css" rel="stylesheet"/>
  <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
  <script src="https://code.jquery.com/ui/1.11.0/jquery-ui.min.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
  <input id=completer type=text />
</body>
</html>

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