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Java lets you declare new fields inside anonymous classes, but I can't figure out how to access them from outside, even setting them to public doesn't let me.

class A {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
       Object o = new Object() {
           public int x = 0;
           {
               System.out.println("x: " + x++);
               System.out.println("x: " + x++);
           }
       };
       System.out.println(o.x);
   }
}

I get this compiler error:

$ javac A.java && java A
A.java:10: cannot find symbol
symbol  : variable x
location: class java.lang.Object
       System.out.println(o.x);
                           ^
1 error

Why?

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This aint JavaScript man :D –  Lukas Knuth May 10 '13 at 23:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why?

It's because Object is the static type of the variable o, and Object doesn't have the property x. The following fails to compile for the exact same reason:

public class X {
  public int x;

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Object o = new X();
    o.x = 3;
  }
}

Hopefully, your Java intuition is right on this example and you expect this to fail. So just transplant that intuition to your example.

How to access fields declared inside anonymous object?

Same way as you'd access x in my example: reflection.

Object o = new X();
o.getClass().getField("x").setInt(o, 3);

Why does it let me make public fields if I can't use them?

If it didn't let you make public fields, even reflection wouldn't work for you, at least not as simply as above.

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You could only do that by reflection. The class has no name, so you had to declare the variable o as an Object, and Object does not have that member. In other words, don't do this.

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Then howcome unused variables are a compile error? It's easier to not prohibit that yet Java does it. –  Dog May 10 '13 at 20:50
    
Unused variables are not a compile error by the Java Language Specification. What an IDE is configured to report as an error has nothing to do with Java the language. –  Marko Topolnik May 10 '13 at 21:19
    
@MarkoTopolnik, Oops. I meant, unreachable lines of code cause compile errors. Also it's easier not to have types, so I wouldn't argue that Java is in the business of making something so just because it's easier to implement. –  Dog May 10 '13 at 22:27
    
I deleted my comment because it became nonsense when another comment was deleted. –  Eric Jablow May 11 '13 at 9:40

You could access it directly on the anonymous class creation expression:

class A {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
       System.out.println(new Object() {
           public int x = 0;
           {
               System.out.println("x: " + x++);
               System.out.println("x: " + x++);
           }
       }.x);
   }
}

But then, you can't otherwise use the object created anymore, so it's kinda useless.

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You could acces the field by reflection:

    Object o = new Object() {
       public int x = 0;
       {
           System.out.println("x: " + x++);
           System.out.println("x: " + x++);
       }
   };
   System.out.println(o.getClass().getField("x").get(o));

Better Style would be to name the class and use it as variable type, if you want to access field:

    class MyObject {
       public int x = 0;
       {
           System.out.println("x: " + x++);
           System.out.println("x: " + x++);
       }
   }
   MyObject o = new MyObject();
   System.out.println(o.x);
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Define an internal class that extends Object (in your specific case you should not write extends Object as it is done anyway. In your class, define your fields and than access them by reference of your type.

Example:

void func() {
     class MyInt extends Integer {
         boolean isSane = true;
     }
     MyInt intInstance = new MyInt();
     if (intInstance .isSane) {
         System.out.println("sane integer");
     }
}
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