Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to improve performance in our app. I've got performance information in the form of a tree of calls, with the following node class:

public class Node
{
    public string Name; // method name
    public decimal Time; // time spent in method
    public List<Node> Children;
}

I want to print out the tree such that I can see lines between the nodes - something like in this question. What's an algorithm I can use in C# for doing that?

Edit: Obviously I need to use recursion - but my attempts keep putting the lines in the wrong places. What I'm asking for is a specific algorithm that will print the tree in a nice manner - the details of when to print a vertical line and when to print a horizontal one.

Edit: It isn't sufficient just to use copies of a string to indent the nodes. I'm not looking for

A
|-B
|-|-C
|-|-D
|-|-|-E
|-F
|-|-G

it has to be

A
+-B
| +-C
| +-D
|   +-E
+-F
  +-G

or anything similar, so long as the tree structure is visible. Notice that C and D are indented differently to G - I can't just use a repeated string to indent the nodes.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 43 down vote accepted

The trick is to pass a string as the indent and to treat the last child specially:

class Node
{    
   public void PrintPretty(string indent, bool last)
   {
       Console.Write(indent);
       if (last)
       {
           Console.Write("\\-");
           indent += "  ";
       }
       else
       {
           Console.Write("|-");
           indent += "| ";
       }
       Console.WriteLine(Name);

       for (int i = 0; i < Children.Count; i++)
           Children[i].PrintPretty(indent, i == Children.Count - 1);
   }
}

If called like this:

root.PrintPretty("", true);

will output in this style:

\-root
  \-child
    |-child
    \-child
      |-child
      |-child
      \-child
        |-child
        |-child
        | |-child
        | \-child
        |   |-child
        |   |-child
        |   |-child
        |   \-child
        |     \-child
        |       \-child
        \-child
          |-child
          |-child
          |-child
          | \-child
          \-child
            \-child
share|improve this answer

Create PrintNode method and use recursion:

class Node
{
    public string Name;
    public decimal Time;
    public List<Node> Children = new List<Node>();

    public void PrintNode(string prefix)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} + {1} : {2}", prefix, this.Name, this.Time);
        foreach (Node n in Children)
            if (Children.IndexOf(n) == Children.Count - 1)
                n.PrintNode(prefix + "    ");
            else
                n.PrintNode(prefix + "   |");
    }
}

ANd then to print the whole tree just execute:

topNode.PrintNode("");

In my example it would give us something like that:

 + top : 123
   | + Node 1 : 29
   |   | + subnode 0 : 90
   |   |     + sdhasj : 232
   |   | + subnode 1 : 38
   |   | + subnode 2 : 49
   |   | + subnode 8 : 39
   |     + subnode 9 : 47
     + Node 2 : 51
       | + subnode 0 : 89
       |     + sdhasj : 232
       | + subnode 1 : 33
         + subnode 3 : 57
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't draw the tree, it just indents using copies of "|--". I want to be able to see the tree, so the algorithm has to leave gaps. –  Simon Oct 30 '09 at 10:51
    
+1 Good example. –  Groo Oct 30 '09 at 10:53
    
Sorry, but I don't understand what are you talking about. It does something similar to what was on example you gave. What exactly do you want to achieve? What "gaps"? –  Gacek Oct 30 '09 at 10:54
    
@Gacek: I've updated the question to show what I mean. –  Simon Oct 30 '09 at 10:55
    
OK, I gave you another example. What I wrote is just the main concept, think a little bit on your own and use it to your purposes. The idea is the same, but you just need to think of good, "smart" way of using it. Good luck! –  Gacek Oct 30 '09 at 11:02

If you happen to have a very deep tree and your call stack size is limited, you can instead do a static, non-recursive tree traversal like so:

public static void PrintTree(Node tree)
{
    List<Node> firstStack = new List<Node>();
    firstStack.Add(tree);

    List<List<Node>> childListStack = new List<List<Node>>();
    childListStack.Add(firstStack);

    while (childListStack.Count > 0)
    {
        List<Node> childStack = childListStack[childListStack.Count - 1];

        if (childStack.Count == 0)
        {
            childListStack.RemoveAt(childListStack.Count - 1);
        }
        else
        {
            tree = childStack[0];
            childStack.RemoveAt(0);

            string indent = "";
            for (int i = 0; i < childListStack.Count - 1; i++)
            {
                indent += (childListStack[i].Count > 0) ? "|  " : "   ";
            }

            Console.WriteLine(indent + "+- " + tree.Name);

            if (tree.Children.Count > 0)
            {
                childListStack.Add(new List<Node>(tree.Children));
            }
        }
    }
}

Which would output something like this:

+- root
   +- branch-A
   |  +- sibling-X
   |  |  +- grandchild-A
   |  |  +- grandchild-B
   |  +- sibling-Y
   |  |  +- grandchild-C
   |  |  +- grandchild-D
   |  +- sibling-Z
   |     +- grandchild-E
   |     +- grandchild-F
   +- branch-B
      +- sibling-J
      +- sibling-K
share|improve this answer

i am using the following method to print a BST

private void print(Node root, String prefix) {
    if (root == null) {
    System.out.println(prefix + "+- <null>");
    return;
    }

    System.out.println(prefix + "+- " + root);
    print(root.left, prefix + "|  ");
    print(root.right, prefix + "|  ");
}

Following is the output.

+- 43(l:0, d:1)
|  +- 32(l:1, d:3)
|  |  +- 10(l:2, d:0)
|  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  +- 40(l:2, d:2)
|  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  +- 41(l:3, d:0)
|  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  +- 75(l:1, d:5)
|  |  +- 60(l:2, d:1)
|  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  +- 73(l:3, d:0)
|  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  +- 100(l:2, d:4)
|  |  |  +- 80(l:3, d:3)
|  |  |  |  +- 79(l:4, d:2)
|  |  |  |  |  +- 78(l:5, d:1)
|  |  |  |  |  |  +- 76(l:6, d:0)
|  |  |  |  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  |  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  |  +- <null>
|  |  |  +- <null>
share|improve this answer
    
pretty good @KSC, by far the best method to me for BST. I'll just leave out the output for null's. –  David Hernandez Mar 29 at 5:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.