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I want to know which is the best way to create a two-ways father-children relationship in ruby. For example, the following code:

class Bar
  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
   end
end

class Foo
  attr_accessor :children
  def initialize(names = %w(john ben maudy))
    @children = names.map{|n| Bar.new(n)}
  end
end

With this, it is fairy easy to get from a Foo instance to its Bar children. But it doesn't have the other way around. For for example:

# Instanciates a Foo and get his first son
bar = Foo.new.children.first
# bar can't get to his parent. Essentially, I want 
bar.foo

The only idea I had so far is to pass self in the Bar#new method, to keep the reference on the bar objects, but I would like to avoid this. Can you explain me a better way?

EDIT

From google I could find the caller method, which gives me the line number. However I was looking for an object reference, a little more abstract than the line number.

EDIT 2

You can do this in python

EDIT 3

This spinoff of pry seems to be best fit. If anyone can find a way to do this without the gem, I might answer my own question with it.

share|improve this question
    
Giving Bar inheritance from Foo may give you the access you want. –  user2276204 May 10 '13 at 20:45
    
@user2276204 but Foo can be monkey and bar can be banana - the relationship makes sense without intheritance –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 21:59
    
You might want to change your terminology/instance variable names. This has nothing to do with a parent/child relationship in the OO sense and is probably confusing things. –  Jim Stewart May 10 '13 at 22:24
    
@JimStewart feel free to edit –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 22:27
1  
@fotanus I've dug into binding_of_caller. It needs to extend the Ruby implementation in order to make accessible the callstack. You cannot do it in pure ruby. –  toch May 10 '13 at 23:06
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a strong composition, where the component couldn't be built without a reference to the composite.

That means you need to initialized them with that composite (i.e. pass self to the Bar instance). This is the way to do it, as you need a reference to the owner. You can possibly set it after, for instance bar.foo = foo, but it will implement a looser link, an aggregation.

If we don't receive a reference, we need to find it somewhere. We can make Foo a singleton, but it's an anti-pattern as it's like a global variable. Bar instances could request to another object what's the reference of their Foo. If there is multiple instances of Foo, you need to identify them, with an id for instance, but that means Bar instances need that id. Then, why not working directly with the reference of the instance of Foo?

As conclusion, IMHO the only good solution consists in passing a reference of Foo when building a new Bar instance. If the intention is to respect OO paradigm, IMHO it's bad idea to hide that important relation implementation.

Code for the initialization of Bar instance with Foo instance

class Bar # Class of the component
  attr_reader :foo

  # the component must be initialized/built
  # with a ref to the composite foo
  def initialize(name, foo) 
    @name = name
    @foo = foo
   end
end

class Foo # Class of the composite
  attr_reader :children

  def initialize(names = %w(john ben maudy))
    @children = names.map do |n|
      Bar.new(n, self) # pass self to build the component
    end
  end
end

bar = Foo.new.children.first
bar.foo

Update about binding_of_caller

It's an interesting project making accessible the callstack. In the current case, it would be used in Bar::initialized method to find the composite, who is the caller, and ask it to return self.

However, the project needs to extend the Ruby implementation. It's then not pure ruby.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting link, thanks - but the self-as-argument solution, as I stated, I already thought on. –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 22:21
    
Sorry, I've missed your last question. I'll update my answer. –  toch May 10 '13 at 22:23
1  
What's your opposition to passing self? It is the right and best way to model this sort of relationship. –  Jim Stewart May 10 '13 at 22:24
    
@toch I don't have an answer with that. Yet I don't think this invalidates the question - maybe if we don't had to do this, we would feel happier? –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 22:40
1  
@toch I'm just an unsatisfied guy with toy projects. –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 23:00
show 3 more comments

I think you should just pass foos into Bar's constructor like:

class Bar
  def initialize(name, parent)
    @name = name
    @parent = parent
   end
end

class Foo
  attr_accessor :children
  def initialize(names = %w(john ben maudy))
    @children = names.map{|n| Bar.new(n, self)}
  end
end

This way each bar will have a reference to the foo that created it.

If you really don't want to pass foo into bar's constructor, you could also do something like the following, but I don't think it gains you much.

class Bar
  attr_accessor :foo
  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
   end
end

class Foo
  attr_accessor :children
  def initialize(names = %w(john ben maudy))
    @children = names.map{|n| Bar.new(n)}
  end
  def get_nth_child(n)
    bar = @children[n]
    bar.foo = self
    bar
  end
end

and then you access your original foo like:

Foo.new.get_nth_child(1).foo
share|improve this answer
    
Read my question again: The only idea I had so far is to pass self in the Bar#new method, to keep the reference on the bar objects, but it is ugly. –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 22:17
    
@fotanus see my edit. It will work, but I think the first option is better. –  Andbdrew May 10 '13 at 22:34
    
Interesting, maybe better overwriting the [] operator? This is not exactly what I was looking for, but is very interesting anyway. +1 for creativity. –  fotanus May 10 '13 at 22:42
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