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Okay. My original question turned out to be caused by not initializing some arrays. The original issue had to do with code crashing R. When I was trying to debug it by commenting things out, I by mistake commented out the lines that initialized the arrays. So I thought my problem had to do with passing pointers.

The actual problem is this. As I said before, I want to use outer_pos to calculate outer differences and pass both the pointers of the results and the total number of positive differences back to a function that calls outer_pos

#include <R.h>
#include <Rmath.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


void outer_pos(double *x, double *y, int *n, double *output){
    int i, j, l=0;
    for(i=0; i<*n; i++){
        for(j=0; j<*n; j++){
            if((x[j]-x[i])>0){
                output[l+1]=(y[j]-y[i])/(x[j]-x[i]);
                output[0]=(double)(++l);
            }
        }
    } 
    Rprintf("%d\n", (int)output[0]);
}


void foo1(double *x, double *y, int *nsamp){
    int i, j, k, oper=2, l;
    double* v1v2=malloc(sizeof(double)*((*nsamp)*(*nsamp-1)/2 + 1));

    outer_pos(x, y, nsamp, &v1v2[0]);
    double v1v2b[1999000];    // <--------------HERE
    for(i=1; i<= (int)v1v2[0]; i++){
        v1v2b[i-1]=1;
    }
}

Suppose foo1 is the function that calls outer_pos. Here I specified the size of the array v1v2b using an actual number 1999000. This value corresponds to the number of positive differences. Calling foo1 from R causes no problem. It's all fine.

In the scenario above, I know the number of positive differences, so I can use the actual value to set the array size. But I would like to accommodate situations where I don't necessarily know the value. foo2 below is intended to do that. As you can see, v1v2b is initialized using the first value of the array v1v2. Recall that the first slot of the output of outer_pos stores the number of positive differences. So basically I use this value to set v1v2's size. However, calling this function in R causes R to either show a stack overflow error or causes it to crash (see screen shot below)

void foo2(double *x, double *y, int *nsamp){
    int i, j, k, oper=2, l;
    double* v1v2=malloc(sizeof(double)*((*nsamp)*(*nsamp-1)/2 + 1));

    outer_pos(x, y, nsamp, &v1v2[0]);
    double v1v2b[(int)v1v2[0]];        //<--------HERE
    for(i=1; i<= (int)v1v2[0]; i++){
        v1v2b[i-1]=1;
    }
}

So I thought, maybe it has to do with indexation. Maybe the actual size of v1v2b is too small, or something, so the loop iterates outside the bound. So I created foo2b in which I commented out the loop, and use Rprintf to print the first slot of v1v2 to see if the value stored in it is correct. But it seems that the value v1v2[0] is correct, namely 1999000. So I don't know what is happening here.

Sorry for the confusion with my previous question!!

void foo2b(double *x, double *y, int *nsamp){
        int i, j, k, oper=2, l;
        double* v1v2=malloc(sizeof(double)*((*nsamp)*(*nsamp-1)/2 + 1));

        outer_pos(x, y, nsamp, &v1v2[0]);
        double v1v2b[(int)v1v2[0]];         //<----Array size declared by a variable
       Rprintf("%d", (int)v1v2[0]);
        //for(i=1; i<= (int)v1v2[0]; i++){
            //v1v2b[i-1]=v1v2[i];
        //}
}

R code to run the code above:

x=rnorm(2000)
y=rnorm(2000)
.C("foo1", x=as.double(x), y=as.double(y), nsamp=as.integer(2000))
.C("foo2", x=as.double(x), y=as.double(y), nsamp=as.integer(2000))
.C("foo2b", x=as.double(x), y=as.double(y), nsamp=as.integer(2000))

enter image description here enter image description here

** FOLLOW UP **

I modified my code based on Martin's suggestion to check if the stack overflow issue can be resolved:

void foo2b(double *x, double *y, int *nsamp) {
    int n = *nsamp, i;
    double *v1v2, *v1v2b;

    v1v2 = (double *) R_alloc(n * (n - 1) / 2 + 1, sizeof(double));
    /* outer_pos(x, y, nsamp, v1v2); */
    v1v2b = (double *) R_alloc((size_t) v1v2[0], sizeof(int));
    for(i=0; i< (int)v1v2[0]; i++){
        v1v2b[i]=1;
    }
    //qsort(v1v2b, (size_t) v1v2[0], sizeof(double), mycompare);
    /* ... */
}

After compiling it, I ran the code:

x=rnorm(1000)
y=rnorm(1000)
.C("foo2b", x=as.double(x), y=as.double(y), nsamp=as.integer(length(x)))

And got an error message: Error: cannot allocate memory block of size 34359738368.0 Gb

** FOLLOW UP 2 **

It seems that the error message shows up every other run of the function. At least it did not crash R...So basically function alternates between running with no problem and showing an error message. (I included both headers in my script file).

share|improve this question
    
A suggestion here is in order. You should try to make your questions smaller and more self-contained, and that means taking the effort to make smaller code that exhibits the problem. (Note that this is what we all do, when we have an outcome that we don't understand.) Editing the question multiple times with radical changes isn't good for the Q&A format and is not kind to the people trying to answer. –  Matthew Lundberg May 11 '13 at 2:34
    
Suggestion taken! Thank you for your help! –  Alex May 11 '13 at 2:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As before, you're allocating on the stack, but should be allocating from the heap. Correct this using malloc / free as you did in your previous question (actually, I think the recommended approach is Calloc / Free or if your code returns to R simply R_alloc; R_alloc automatically recovers the memory when returning to R, even in the case of an error that R catches).

qsort is mentioned in a comment. It takes as its final argument a user-supplied function that defines how its first argument is to be sorted. The signature of qsort (from man qsort) is

void qsort(void *base, size_t nmemb, size_t size,
           int(*compar)(const void *, const void *));

with the final argument being 'a pointer to a function that takes two constant void pointers and returns an int'. A function satisfying this signature and sorting pointers to two doubles according to the specification on the man page is

int mycompare(const void *p1, const void *p2)
{
    const double d1 = *(const double *) p1,
                 d2 = *(const double *) p2;
    return d1 < d2 ? -1 : (d2 > d1 ? 1 : 0);
}

So

#include <Rdefines.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int mycompare(const void *p1, const void *p2)
{
    const double d1 = *(const double *) p1,
                 d2 = *(const double *) p2;
    return d1 < d2 ? -1 : (d2 > d1 ? 1 : 0);
}

void outer_pos(double *x, double *y, int *n, double *output){
    int i, j, l = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < *n; i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < *n; j++) {
            if ((x[j] - x[i]) > 0) {
                output[l + 1] = (y[j] - y[i]) / (x[j] - x[i]);
                output[0] = (double)(++l);
            }
        }
    } 
}

void foo2b(double *x, double *y, int *nsamp) {
    int n = *nsamp;
    double *v1v2, *v1v2b;

    v1v2 = (double *) R_alloc(n * (n - 1) / 2 + 1, sizeof(double));
    outer_pos(x, y, nsamp, v1v2);
    v1v2b = (double *) R_alloc((size_t) v1v2[0], sizeof(double));
    qsort(v1v2b, (size_t) v1v2[0], sizeof(double), mycompare);
    /* ... */
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will try calloc. I actually tried malloc, and it crashed my R. Also, can you explain why directly using an integer does not cause any problem? –  Alex May 11 '13 at 0:59
    
calloc is simply malloc followed by an initialization loop. It is no magic bullet. When you used malloc, did you remember to multiply the number of elements by sizeof(double) to get the number of bytes to allocate? –  Matthew Lundberg May 11 '13 at 1:00
    
@MatthewLundberg yes but Calloc is defined in the R headers and (is supposed to) check that the memory allocation actually succeeds ('is supposed to' because I believe one or all of Calloc, R_alloc, or Realloc fails incorrectly if asked to allocate 0 elements). –  Martin Morgan May 11 '13 at 1:02
    
That is different, Martin. Thanks. It's possible that a 16M allocation would fail, but it seems more likely that he asked for the wrong size. –  Matthew Lundberg May 11 '13 at 1:03
    
@MatthewLundberg I did exactly what you suggested in my previous post, so I did multiply the number of elements by sizeof(double). But just in case, let me redo it. Also, I prefer not to use malloc because I need to sort the array - qsort(v1v2b, (int)v1v2[0], sizeof(v1v2b[0]), compare). Apparently, qsort does not deal with pointers? –  Alex May 11 '13 at 1:04

When foo2b calls outer_pos, it is passing two allocated but uninitialized arrays as x and y. You can't depend on their contents, thus you have different results from different invocations.

Edit

You're dangerously close to your stack size with 1999000 doubles, which take just over 15.25MB, and that's because you're on Mac OS. On most other platforms, threads don't get anywhere near 16M of stack.

You don't start out with a clean (empty) stack when you call this function -- you're deep into R functions, each creating frames that take space on the stack.

Edit 2

Below, you are using an uninitialized value v1v2[0] as an argument to R-alloc. That you get an error sometimes (and not always) is not a surprise.

v1v2 = (double *) R_alloc(n * (n - 1) / 2 + 1, sizeof(double));
/* outer_pos(x, y, nsamp, v1v2); */
v1v2b = (double *) R_alloc((size_t) v1v2[0], sizeof(int));
share|improve this answer
    
Actually never mind. I think I copied the wrong code...The actual problem code is not this one. Let me edit it. –  Alex May 10 '13 at 20:49
    
I fixed my question. Sorry about the confusion. –  Alex May 10 '13 at 21:32
    
Could you explain why in v1v2b = (double *) R_alloc((size_t) v1v2[0], sizeof(int)); it is sizeof(int), not sizeof(double)? –  Alex May 11 '13 at 1:48
1  
@Alex That looks like another error. You should have 32-bit int and 64-bit double (for interoperability with R). –  Matthew Lundberg May 11 '13 at 1:57
    
Yeah. it seems that after replacing int with double, i no longer get the allocation error message. –  Alex May 11 '13 at 1:59

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