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I am trying to create a general sum function template. This template will be left associative. Below is my implementation

    int result=0;
template <typename D, typename T>
const T &sum_helper(const D &d, const T &v) {
    result=result+v;
    return result;
}
int pass(...){}

template <typename D, typename T1, typename... Ts>
auto sum_helper(const D &d, const T1 &v1, const Ts &... params) -> decltype(v1 + sum_helper(d, params...)) {
    return v1 + sum_helper(d, params... );
}

class A {};

template <typename... Ns> 
struct seq {};

template <typename... Ts>
auto sum(const Ts &... params) -> decltype(sum_helper(A(), params...)) 
{
    return  pass((sum_helper(seq<Ts...>(),params)) ...,1);

}

But when I call it like sum(1,2,3,4) it outputs 0 always. Whats wrong? I know that pass should be corrected. But what is the way to correct it?

share|improve this question
    
What are pass/seq for? –  Rollie May 10 '13 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Original answer doesn't work, because the trailing return type uses an overload prior to its point of declaration. It's impossible to forward declare a function before knowing its return type, also. So we need a helper struct. Here's the (unfortunately now very complicated) version that works:

#include <utility>

template <typename...>
struct sum_impl;

/* This is the base case */
template <typename T1, typename T2>
struct sum_impl<T1, T2>
{
    typedef decltype(std::declval<const T1&>() + std::declval<const T2&>()) result_type;

    static result_type doit(const T1& v1, const T2& v2)
    {
        return v1 + v2;
    }
};

/* And here is the recursive definition for left-associativity */
template <typename T1, typename T2, typename... Ts>
struct sum_impl<T1, T2, Ts...>
{
    typedef decltype(std::declval<const T1&>() + std::declval<const T2&>()) step_type;
    typedef typename sum_impl<step_type, Ts...>::result_type result_type;

    static result_type doit(const T1& v1, const T2& v2, const Ts&... rest)
    {
        return sum_impl<step_type, Ts...>::doit(v1 + v2, rest...);
    }
};

template <typename... Ts>
typename sum_impl<Ts...>::result_type sum(const Ts&... args)
{
    return sum_impl<Ts...>::doit(args...);
}

Demo: http://ideone.com/jMwgLz


Here's a version that retains the simplicity of Named's answer but is left associative:

/* not really needed, unless someone wants to call sum with only a single argument */
template <typename T>
T sum(const T& v)
{
    return v;
}

/* This is the base case */
template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto sum(const T1& v1, const T2& v2) -> decltype( v1 + v2 )
{
    return v1 + v2;
}

/* And here is the recursive definition for left-associativity */
template <typename T1, typename T2, typename... Ts>
auto sum(const T1& v1, const T2& v2, const Ts&... rest) -> decltype( sum(v1 + v2, rest...) )
{
    return sum(v1 + v2, rest... );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that looks better than mine :P –  Rollie May 13 '13 at 2:06
    
@Ben this is awesome! Almost correct.. but if I give more than 4 arguments it seems to fail to compile –  footy May 13 '13 at 2:19
    
@footy: I see, it is because the trailing return type uses recursion, but it's before the point of declaration for the current overload. Don't the other answers fail similarly? –  Ben Voigt May 13 '13 at 3:02
    
@footy: Ok, got it fixed. –  Ben Voigt May 13 '13 at 3:22
    
And, it looks like someone already figured this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/6065810/… –  Ben Voigt May 13 '13 at 3:25

Here's a simpler solution:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <typename T1>
auto _sum(T1 & _ret, const T1 & _t1) -> T1
{
    _ret += _t1;
    return _ret;
}

template <typename T1, typename... Ts>
auto _sum(T1 & _ret, const T1 & _t1, const Ts &... params) -> T1 
{
    _ret += _t1;
    return _sum(_ret, params...);
}

template <typename T1, typename... Ts>
auto sum(const T1 & _t1, const Ts &... params) -> T1 
{
    T1 ret = _t1;
    return _sum(ret, params...);    
}

int main()
{
    cout << sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Could you please explain how is this left associative? –  footy May 10 '13 at 22:24
    
@footy: Because it calculates 1 + (2 + 3 + 4 + 5). Be aware that left-associativety does NOT fix the order of evaluation in general. –  MSalters May 10 '13 at 22:37
    
I tried the following for objects after overloading + operator. It says template argument deduction/substitution failed .. How? I am not able to understand –  footy May 11 '13 at 1:38
    
Tried what exactly? –  Rollie May 11 '13 at 2:25
    
1+(...) is right-associative. Left-associative would be (...)+5. –  Matthias Benkard May 11 '13 at 9:41

But when I call it like sum(1,2,3,4) it outputs 0 always. Whats wrong?

That is because pass is not returning anything so what you have here is Undefined Behavior since you are flowing out of a non void function with out returning anything.

I don't know why you even needed pass here

return  pass((sum_helper(seq<Ts...>(),params)) ...,1);

You can just expand the variadic args and send them directly to sum_helper. like this

return  sum_helper(seq<Ts...>(),params...);


However a simpler version would be

template <typename T>
T sum(const T& v) {
    return v;
}

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto sum(const T1& v1, const T2& v2) -> decltype( v1 + v2) {
    return v1 + v2;
}

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename... Ts>
auto sum(const T1& v1, const T2& v2, const Ts&... rest) -> decltype( v1 + v2 + sum(rest...) ) {
    return v1 + v2 + sum(rest... );
}

int main() {
    cout << sum(1,2,3,4);    
}

And an even simpler version is provided by Rollie's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried the following for objects after overloading + operator. It says template argument deduction/substitution failed .. How? I am not able to understand –  footy May 11 '13 at 1:48
    
I think your solution won't work for sum(1,2,3); or any odd number of args; it will go to the variadic sum and call 1+2+sum(3), and sum(3) is not defined. –  Rollie May 11 '13 at 2:40
    
@Rollie Yes. I have fixed it. The reason I chose two args in the long version of sum is because gcc doesn't see to be able to deduct decltype( v1 + sum(rest...) ) properly for some reason. It matches it when there are two args matched and the rest expanded. –  Named May 11 '13 at 12:10
    
@footy What kind of error messages? and what kind of objects are you adding? –  Named May 11 '13 at 12:11

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