Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that in Safari on an iPhone you can detect the screen's orientation and change of orientation by listening for the onorientationchange event and querying window.orientation for the angle.

Is this possible in the browser on Android phones?

To be clear, I am asking whether the rotation of an Android device can be detected by JavaScript running on a standard web page. It is possible on an iPhone and I wondered whether it could be done for Android phones.

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 150 down vote accepted

The short answer is "YES". To detect an orientation change on an Android browser, add a listener for either the 'orientationchange' or 'resize' event on window:

// Detect whether device supports orientationchange event, otherwise fall back to
// the resize event.
var supportsOrientationChange = "onorientationchange" in window,
    orientationEvent = supportsOrientationChange ? "orientationchange" : "resize";

window.addEventListener(orientationEvent, function() {
    alert('HOLY ROTATING SCREENS BATMAN:' + window.orientation + " " + screen.width);
}, false);

You can then check the window.orientation property to figure out which way the device is oriented. With Android phones, screen.width or screen.height also updates as the device is rotated. (this is not the case with the iPhone).

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't appear to work on a Nexus One –  Jeremy Mar 5 '10 at 16:50
    
updated the code for nexus one –  jb. Mar 5 '10 at 23:53
7  
On the Droid this is completely insane. It alerts screen.width of 320 when the phone is rotated in landscape mode, and it detects screen.width 569 when the phone is rotated in portrait mode! How come?? –  Igor Ganapolsky Jul 26 '11 at 14:34
1  
Just to clarify: Those looking for a solution that also works on iOS should look at two-bit-fool's or my answer. –  mklement0 Dec 10 '12 at 16:39
1  
No need to use two-bit-fool's hack for iOS. Just use screen.width and screen.height on Android and on iOS use window.innerWidth and window.innerHeight. –  Justin Jan 8 '13 at 18:59

The actual behavior across different devices is inconsistent. The resize and orientationChange events can fire in a different sequence with varying frequency. Also, some values (e.g. screen.width and window.orientation) don't always change when you expect. Avoid screen.width -- it doesn't change when rotating in iOS.

The reliable approach is to listen to both resize and orientationChange events (with some polling as a safety catch), and you'll eventually get a valid value for the orientation. In my testing, Android devices occasionally fail to fire events when rotating a full 180 degrees, so I've also included a setInterval to poll the orientation.

var previousOrientation = window.orientation;
var checkOrientation = function(){
    if(window.orientation !== previousOrientation){
        previousOrientation = window.orientation;
        // orientation changed, do your magic here
    }
};

window.addEventListener("resize", checkOrientation, false);
window.addEventListener("orientationchange", checkOrientation, false);

// (optional) Android doesn't always fire orientationChange on 180 degree turns
setInterval(checkOrientation, 2000);

Here are the results from the four devices that I've tested (sorry for the ASCII table, but it seemed like the easiest way to present the results). Aside from the consistency between the iOS devices, there is a lot of variety across devices. NOTE: The events are listed in the order that they fired.

|==============================================================================|
|     Device     | Events Fired      | orientation | innerWidth | screen.width |
|==============================================================================|
| iPad 2         | resize            | 0           | 1024       | 768          |
| (to landscape) | orientationchange | 90          | 1024       | 768          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| iPad 2         | resize            | 90          | 768        | 768          |
| (to portrait)  | orientationchange | 0           | 768        | 768          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| iPhone 4       | resize            | 0           | 480        | 320          |
| (to landscape) | orientationchange | 90          | 480        | 320          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| iPhone 4       | resize            | 90          | 320        | 320          |
| (to portrait)  | orientationchange | 0           | 320        | 320          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| Droid phone    | orientationchange | 90          | 320        | 320          |
| (to landscape) | resize            | 90          | 569        | 569          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| Droid phone    | orientationchange | 0           | 569        | 569          |
| (to portrait)  | resize            | 0           | 320        | 320          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| Samsung Galaxy | orientationchange | 0           | 400        | 400          |
| Tablet         | orientationchange | 90          | 400        | 400          |
| (to landscape) | orientationchange | 90          | 400        | 400          |
|                | resize            | 90          | 683        | 683          |
|                | orientationchange | 90          | 683        | 683          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
| Samsung Galaxy | orientationchange | 90          | 683        | 683          |
| Tablet         | orientationchange | 0           | 683        | 683          |
| (to portrait)  | orientationchange | 0           | 683        | 683          |
|                | resize            | 0           | 400        | 400          |
|                | orientationchange | 0           | 400        | 400          |
|----------------+-------------------+-------------+------------+--------------|
share|improve this answer
4  
Thanks for a very thorough answer! –  RichieHindle Sep 19 '11 at 15:28
    
This is awesome. –  ThinkingStiff Apr 17 '12 at 8:22
    
In the iOS5 emulator, if you refresh in landscape then rotate, this code does not fire. –  worked May 26 '12 at 14:23
1  
What a mess, thanks for the detailed answer! –  travis May 31 '12 at 22:10
1  
Great answer. previousOrientation should be initialized with the then-current orientation: var previousOrientation = window.orientation; If you want to ignore 180-degree rotations, i.e., you don't need to distinguish between the left-or-right landscape and upside-down-or-not variants, add the following as the first line to checkOrientation(): if (0 === (previousOrientation + window.orientation) % 180) return; However, without additional setTimeout trickery, you will only benefit from this on iOS, where a swift 180-degree rotation only creates a single orientationchange event. –  mklement0 Dec 10 '12 at 15:04

two-bit-fool's excellent answer provides all the background, but let me attempt a concise, pragmatic summary of how to handle orientation changes across iOS and Android:

  • If you only care about window dimensions (the typical scenario) - and not about the specific orientation:
    • Handle the resize event only.
    • In your handler, act on window.innerWidth and window.InnerHeight only.
    • Do NOT use window.orientation - it won't be current on iOS.
  • If you DO care about the specific orientation:
    • Handle only the resize event on Android, and only the orientationchange event on iOS.
    • In your handler, act on window.orientation (and window.innerWidth and window.InnerHeight)

These approaches offer slight benefits over remembering the previous orientation and comparing:

  • the dimensions-only approach also works while developing on desktop browsers that can otherwise simulate mobile devices, e.g., Chrome 23. (window.orientation is not available on desktop browsers).
  • no need for a global/anonymous-file-level-function-wrapper-level variable.
share|improve this answer

You could always listen to the window resize event. If, on that event, the window went from being taller than it is wide to wider than it is tall (or vice versa), you can be pretty sure the phone orientation was just changed.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good idea, I'll try that (and ask my friend with the Android phone to test!) –  philnash Oct 30 '09 at 18:01
    
I've just realised that this method doesn't give me the orientation of the phone. I will know whether it is portrait or landscape, but not if it is upside down or has been turned to the left or to the right. Any further ideas? –  philnash Nov 3 '09 at 11:44
    
I'm not sure how it could possibly matter... Why do you need to know if the phone is upside down? The phone's browser has a top, and the web page will be oriented to the browser's top. Any user with two brain cells to rub together who's looking at a web page upside-down will just turn their phone around if they want to see it right-side-up –  Joel Mueller Nov 3 '09 at 18:54
    
That's a little harsh. I'm interested to know so that I can show different content based on the orientation of the screen, this could be up to 4 different pages, requiring the browser to know whether it had been rotated by 0, 90, 180 and 270 degrees. This is all possible, in JavaScript, on the iPhone and is why I am asking. –  philnash Nov 5 '09 at 10:19
    
I'm still having a hard time picturing what a web page could usefully do differently when the device it's rendered on is rotated 270 degrees, but if you say you've got a valid use-case, I won't quibble. In that case: I'm sorry, but I have no idea if the Android browser provides this level of detail. –  Joel Mueller Nov 5 '09 at 20:35

It is possible in HTML5.
You can read more (and try a live demo) here: http://slides.html5rocks.com/#slide-orientation.

window.addEventListener('deviceorientation', function(event) {
    var a = event.alpha;
    var b = event.beta;
    var g = event.gamma;
}, false);

It also supports deskop browsers but it will always return the same value.

share|improve this answer
3  
This event is really more for access to the motion sensors, although I suppose it can also be used to detect orientation change. –  René Aug 21 '11 at 20:46
    
On my Android Galaxy S2 it's not supported on the stock browser nor the Dolphin Browser. But works well with mobile firefox. –  Eduardo Jan 27 '12 at 22:55

I had the same problem. I am using Phonegap and Jquery mobile, for Adroid devices. To resize properly I had to set a timeout:

$(window).bind('orientationchange',function(e) {
  fixOrientation();
});

$(window).bind('resize',function(e) {
  fixOrientation();
});

function fixOrientation() {

    setTimeout(function() {

        var windowWidth = window.innerWidth;

        $('div[data-role="page"]').width(windowWidth);
        $('div[data-role="header"]').width(windowWidth);
        $('div[data-role="content"]').width(windowWidth-30);
        $('div[data-role="footer"]').width(windowWidth);

    },500);
}
share|improve this answer

A little contribution to the two-bit-fool's answer:

As described on the table on droid phones "orientationchange" event gets fired earlier than "resize" event thus blocking the next resize call (because of the if statement). Width property is still not set.

A workaround though maybe not a perfect one could be to not fire the "orientationchange" event. That can be archived by wrapping "orientationchange" event binding in "if" statement:

if (!navigator.userAgent.match(/android/i))
{
    window.addEventListener("orientationchange", checkOrientation, false);
}

Hope it helps

(tests were done on Nexus S)

share|improve this answer

Worth noting that on my Epic 4G Touch I had to set up the webview to use WebChromeClient before any of the javascript android calls worked.

webView.setWebChromeClient(new WebChromeClient());
share|improve this answer

Another gotcha - some Android tablets (the Motorola Xoom I believe and a low-end Elonex one I'm doing some testing on, probably others too) have their accelerometers set up so that window.orientation == 0 in LANDSCAPE mode, not portrait!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.