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i've tried to solve my question about classes in c++.In order to prevent complicated issues , i'll write a sample code for my problem. Now here is my problem.

class sample1
{
 public:
 //getter,setter,constructor and destructor functions
 private:
 string label; 

}

class sample2 // in sample2.h #include "sample1" is exist.
{
 public:
  //getter setter constructors and destructors.
  void addSample1(string label);
 private:
  vector<sample1*> sample1's;
}

Now, as you can see , I want to fill the vector in sample2 class with sample1 pointers. I tried to do this with following code but ,clearly vector could only stored one pointer since after exacution of addSample1 function, pointer lost.Here is my code which does not work.

void addSample1(string label)
{       
        sample1  samp1(label);
    sample1 * n_pointer=new samp1(label);
    n_pointer=&samp1;
    sample1's.push_back(n_pointer);
}

Is there anyone who can help me to fix my problem ? thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
You mean vector<sample1*>, right? – tadman May 10 '13 at 21:16
    
@tadman yea you're totally right, sorry for syntax errors, it is just an example for my problem – L-caesar May 10 '13 at 21:17
    
When posting code, please provide code that compiles. It just makes things confusing when you have variables with apostrophe characters in them – Mooing Duck May 10 '13 at 21:44
    
@MooingDuck you're totally right, sorry for inconvenience – L-caesar May 10 '13 at 21:47
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your addSample should be just :

void addSample1(string label)
{       
    sample1s.push_back(new sample1(label));
}

And you will have to be careful and delete those pointers once you are done with them or store smart pointers in the vector instead.

What you are doing in addSample is really bad.

void addSample1(string label)
{       
    // creates a local sample1 object on the stack
    sample1  samp1(label);
    //creates a sample1 object on heap
    sample1 * n_pointer = new sample1(label);
    // overwrites the sample1 pointer with the address of the local object
    // this will leak memory as you have lost the pointer to the dynamically allocated object.
    n_pointer=&samp1;
    //pushes the pointer that points to the local object into the vector
    sample1s.push_back(n_pointer);

   // here the local object is destroyed so now the pointer in the vector 
   // points to deallocated space, accessing it will result in undefined behaviour
}
share|improve this answer
    
,eyvallah hocam yanlız bir sey sormak ıstıyorum new sample1(label) pushlayarak tam olarak ne yapmıs oldum ? ılk defa goruyorum boyle bır seyı – L-caesar May 10 '13 at 21:25
    
new sample1(label) allocates and creates a new sample1 object. Putting it inside the push just adds that pointer at the end of the vector. – Barış Uşaklı May 10 '13 at 21:31
    
Thanks a lot , I realized my big mistake, thanks a lot – L-caesar May 10 '13 at 21:46
    
You're welcome! :) – Barış Uşaklı May 10 '13 at 21:49

how about

void addSample1(string label)
{       
    sample1's.push_back(new sample1(label));
}
share|improve this answer

This ought to work:

void sample2::addSample1(string label)
{       
    sample1* n_pointer=new sample1(label);
    sample1s.push_back(n_pointer);
}

Rename your member variable:

private:
  vector<sample1*> sample1s;
share|improve this answer

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