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I have the following script which is run as:

>> bash test.sh < 0 0

Inside test.sh

read $sni
read $snf

echo 'Run between '$sni' and '$snf
for i in {sni..snf}
do

done

But I get the following error:

test.sh: line 14: [: {sni..snf}: integer expression expected
test.sh: line 19: [: {sni..snf}: integer expression expected

How to I make the loop variable integers? Thanks.

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Also, you should be using read sni, because you don't want variable interpolation there. –  jpaugh May 10 '13 at 22:35
1  
@jpaugh ad 1) Sadly, you can't. If you want to use variables here you have to use seq (with bash anyway). –  Adrian Frühwirth May 10 '13 at 22:39
    
Ouch! Wow! You're right. –  jpaugh May 10 '13 at 22:42
    
@jpaugh We can pretend that you were suggesting to use ksh, which is cleverererer than bash and there it works :-) –  Adrian Frühwirth May 10 '13 at 22:44
    
Haha. Unfortunately, I wasn't that bright. :-) –  jpaugh May 10 '13 at 22:45
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK, to sum up the various input and in case you want to stick with your for syntax.

read $sni

This is indirection. You are not reading into the variable ${sni} but into the variable whose name is held by ${sni}, e.g.:

$ foo=bar
$ read $foo <<< "quux"
$ echo "${foo}"
bar
$ echo "${bar}"
quux

So this should be

read sni

instead. And about ...

for i in {sni..snf}

... this does not work because you are not treating your variables as variables here. If you use ksh then you can do

for i in {${sni}..${snf}}; do
    ...
done

but bash is not so clever in which case you want to use

for i in $(seq ${sni} ${snf}); do
    ...
done

So the whole thing should look more like:

#!/bin/sh

read sni
read snf

echo "Run between '${sni}' and '${snf}'"
for i in $(seq ${sni} ${snf}); do
        echo "i=$i"
done

Example:

$ printf "1\n4\n" | ./t.sh
Run between '1' and '4'
i=1
i=2
i=3
i=4
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You can use something like this

for (( i=$sni ; i<=$snf ; i++ ))

From the bash help

(( ... )): (( expression ))
    Evaluate arithmetic expression.

    The EXPRESSION is evaluated according to the rules for arithmetic
    evaluation.  Equivalent to "let EXPRESSION".

    Exit Status:
    Returns 1 if EXPRESSION evaluates to 0; returns 0 otherwise.

Also you can pass variables to the shell script as command arguments.

bash test.sh 1 2

The would be contained in the variables $1 and $2

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usage ()
{
  echo usage: $0 SNI SNF
  exit
}

[ $2 ] || usage
echo "Run between $1 and $2"

for (( f=$1; $f<=$2; f++))
do
  # do stuff
done
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2 problems:

1) You weren't reading in the variables properly.

You were using:

read $sni
read $snf

When it should be:

read sni
read snf

2) Your loop wasn't spaced or formatted properly.

You were using: for i in {sni..snf}

You should use: for i in { $sni .. $snf }

Note the spacing in the for loop between { $sni .. $snf } as well as the $ sign - both are important.

HTH!

share|improve this answer
    
a) is spot on, but b) is not. –  Adrian Frühwirth May 10 '13 at 22:37
    
@AdrianFrühwirth apologies, typo. Fixed. –  Charles Newey May 10 '13 at 22:39
1  
The typo was not the problem (although it was there), the problem is that what you are suggesting just does not do what you think it does ;-) –  Adrian Frühwirth May 10 '13 at 22:42
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