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I am trying to create a class based on an abstract class and overwrite a function contained in the base class with another one that has a return type of "T" which is a type passed by the class.

e.g:

public abstract class DayInfo
{
    public virtual void GetInfo()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class DayInfo<T> : DayInfo
{
    private T info;
    public DayInfo(T data)
    {
        info = data;
    }

    public T GetInfo() // << This
    {
        return info;
    }
}

Examples:

1

DayInfo info = new DayInfo<String>("Blah");
String stuff = info.GetInfo();

2

DayInfo info = new DayInfo<int>(25);
int stuff = info.GetInfo();

Is there any way to achieve this?

Edit 1: I forgot to precise that I didn't used a class-passed type in the base class because I wanted to be able to use it as a generic type without having to define any type.

e.g:

public SortedDictionary<int, DayInfo> Data = new SortedDictionary<int, DayInfo>();

Edit 2:

Also, the point of the virtual function in the base class is that it will make the child classes throw an exception if the GetInfo() function is accessed but isn't overridden.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This can be produced with NVI pattern:

public abstract class DayInfo
{
  protected virtual void GetInfoCore() {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  // or
  // protected abstract void GetInfoCore();

  public void GetInfo() {
    GetInfoCore();
  }
}

public class DayInfo<T> : DayInfo
{
  private T info;

  public DayInfo(T data) {
    info = data;
  }

  public new T GetInfo() { // << This
    return info;
  }

  protected override void GetInfoCore() {
    GetInfo();
  }
}
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For some reason... it doesn't work. Defined variables aren't able to get the expected data. e.g: new DayInfo<String>("Blah").GetInfo() will STILL be a void function. –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:20
    
It would perform the appropriate function call in theory but wouldn't the compiler cry foul as GetInfo has a return type void if used as the base class? –  McAden May 10 '13 at 23:21
    
@McAden Yes, it would require casting to work, but I'm precisely trying to avoid that. e.g: ((DayInfo<String>)info).GetInfo() –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:25
    
@LouisTakePILLz Are you sure? I was tried my code and it works well: ideone.com/5tJnhN no castings required, wen you works with variable of type DayInfo<String>. –  Viacheslav Ivanov May 11 '13 at 16:13
    
@ViacheslavIvanov Ah I see you used "var item = new DayInfo<string>("aaa")" instead of "DayInfo item = new DayInfo<string>("aaa")". That's why I couldn't get it to work. Well then, it seems to work fine except that I had to make a few changes to get it to work the way I want to, see: pastebin.com/Mygx705Q –  LouisTakePILLz May 12 '13 at 0:37

this is the way to achieve your goal:

public abstract class DayInfoA<T>
{
    public virtual T GetInfo()
    {
        .......
    }
}

public class DayInfoB<T> : DayInfoA<T>
{
    private T info;
    public DayInfoB(T data)
    {
        info = data;
    }

    public override T GetInfo() // << This
    {
      .........
    }
}

and use it like this:

        DayInfoB<int> info = new DayInfoB<int>(25);
        int stuff = info.GetInfo();
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to precise that I didn't used a class-passed type in the base class because I wanted to be able to use it as a generic type without having to define any type. e.g: public SortedDictionary<int, DayInfo> Data = new SortedDictionary<int, DayInfo>(); –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 22:59
    
@LouisTakePILLz for such a general DayInfo what should GetInfo's return type be? –  Tim S. May 10 '13 at 23:06
    
@TimS. I don't get what you mean, mind re-explaining? –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:09
    
GetInfo's return type is T. what you declare in new new DayInfoB<xxx>, xxx is the data type. –  Gisway May 10 '13 at 23:10
    
@Giswin Oh, it can be anything, it could contain a class, string, int... anything really. –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:12

Why dont you declare GetInfo() as dynamic? This way the casting should be automatic. The only downside is that you'd lost the compiler assertions and if the variable that stores GetInfo() value can't do the cast, it'll throw a runtime error.

For example:

public abstract class DayInfo {
    public abstract dynamic GetInfo();
}

public class DayInfo<T> : DayInfo {
    private readonly T _info;
    public DayInfo(T info) {
        _info = info;
    }
    public override dynamic GetInfo() {
        return _info;
    }
}

You also could declare something like GetInfo<T>(ref T result), this way you can omit the T type from the method call and let the compiler infer it at runtime, the only downside is that you should pass the variable to store the result as an argument instead to get it returned by the method.

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You kinda lost me at the dynamic part... (I don't get how this could work). Could you provide an example? –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:47
    
The edit I provided passed some simple tests based on OPs examples: ` DayInfo infoA = new DayInfo<string>("Blah"); string stuffA = infoA.GetInfo(); Assert.AreEqual("Blah", stuffA); DayInfo infoB = new DayInfo<int>(25); int stuffB = infoB.GetInfo(); Assert.AreEqual(25, stuffB); SortedDictionary<int, DayInfo> data = new SortedDictionary<int, DayInfo>();` –  maxwellb May 11 '13 at 0:24
    
You could also make the base GetInfo() throw an exception as virtual, still, if you desired. –  maxwellb May 11 '13 at 0:27
    
@maxwellb This is perfect! It indeed works, Thanks a lot! Edit: I did edit it to throw an exception, thanks again. –  LouisTakePILLz May 11 '13 at 0:30
    
@maxwellb Actually, I might have been celebrating too soon, it's not over yet.. There's still a problem, I can't identify what type of value it is being returned. For instance, DayInfo info = new DayInfo<DayOfWeek>(DayOfWeek.Saturday); var blah = info.GetInfo(); Debug.WriteLine(blah); will throw an exception of type "Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder.RuntimeBinderException", but if we replace "var blah" by "DayOfWeek blah", it will successfully print "blah" in the debug log. –  LouisTakePILLz May 11 '13 at 1:05

No, not like it looks like you're wanting it (assuming you don't want to or cant alter the base class declaration). In order for the function to resolve to a polymorphic call, you need to have the same signature and return type. Otherwise it wont resolve the function polymorphically, it'll just call the base class version of the function since that's what it sees you calling (and the variable you've assigned your instance to is of the base class type).

You CAN do this, but it's pretty ugly:

        DayInfo info = new DayInfo<String>("Blah");
        String stuff = ((DayInfo<string>)info).GetInfo();
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Indeed it is. Although, It seems to be the only solution (yet). –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:26

No, because the functions won't match up with different function signatures.

What you can do is define it like so:

public abstract class DayInfo
{
    public virtual object GetInfo()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

and in the derived class like this:

public object GetInfo() // << This
{
    return info;
}

Then they would both have the same signature and the polymorphism would match up. However, on the other end a cast will be required:

DayInfo info = new DayInfo<int>(25);
int stuff = (int)info.GetInfo();

Edit: As an aside unless there's more to it I'd make that into an interface or if the GetInfo really does nothing make the GetInfo purely abstract.

public abstract object GetInfo();
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Well, in this situation, I'm trying to avoid using casts. So this doesn't make it very useful. –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:14
    
I feel this is the best you're going to get. If you're using it as a base class the compiler has no way of knowing the subclass' implementation. Can you find any other class in the framework that acts the way you're asking? –  McAden May 10 '13 at 23:28
    
Unfortunately, no I don't. –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:42

You could create a covariant interface instead of, or in addition to, a base class:

void Main()
{
    IDayInfo dayInfo = new DayInfo<string>("hi!");
    object info = dayInfo.GetInfo(); //info == "hi!"
}
public interface IDayInfo
{
    object GetInfo();
}
public interface IDayInfo<out T> : IDayInfo
{
    new T GetInfo();
}

public class DayInfo<T> : IDayInfo<T>
{
    private T info;
    public DayInfo(T data)
    {
        info = data;
    }

    public T GetInfo()
    {
        return info;
    }
    object IDayInfo.GetInfo()
    {
        return this.GetInfo();
    }
}

(see Variance in Generic Interfaces for info on what covariance/contravariance are)

Note that object info (in my second line in Main) is as precise as you can get without casting in this example. Once you store the DayInfo<string> object in an IDayInfo<object> variable/field, as I did (and as you'd like to do in your dictionary), the stronger typing of string is, in a sense, forgotten and cannot be restored without a cast.

Update: added IDayInfo interface.

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Isn't there any way to not have to use a defined template variable? e.g: IDayInfo dayInfo = new DayInfo<String>("hi!"); –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:23
    
Only if you have another interface, IDayInfo (you might have IDayInfo<T> : IDayInfo, or let them be separate). I don't like this approach because it means that your implementing classes have to provide object implementations, even if it doesn't make sense to. If you're just concerned about typing out the type name, you could make a using alias directive (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sf0df423.aspx), but I wouldn't advise this for such a simple thing. If your real generic type is much longer, with multiple type parameters, it might make sense. –  Tim S. May 10 '13 at 23:27
    
I can't seem to get this to work (for IDayInfo<T> : IDayInfo), could you provide an example? –  LouisTakePILLz May 10 '13 at 23:32
    
@LouisTakePILLz added to my answer. I meant : as in "extends", not as in a foreach loop, sorry for the confusion. –  Tim S. May 11 '13 at 2:28
    
Actually, I might be the one confusing you; by "(for IDayInfo<T> : IDayInfo)", I wasn't referencing to a "for" loop, I was actually saying "I can't seem to get this code to work FOR "IDayInfo<T> : IDayInfo" ". Sorry for my lack of clarity. Although, I think I better try casting my objects, it will be much more easier, but less pretty :/. Thanks anyways. –  LouisTakePILLz May 11 '13 at 3:23

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