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I'm trying to make a predicate that takes two vectors/lists and uses the first one as a filter. For example:

?- L1=[0,3,0,5,0,0,0,0],L2=[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8],filter(L1,L2,1).
   L1 = [0, 3, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0],
   L2 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] .

That's what I'm getting but I would want true or false if L2 has 3 as the second element, 5 as the fourth element, etc. The 0s are ignored, that's the "filter" condition. What I know from the input is that L1 and L2 are always length=8 and only L1 has 0s.

My code is:

filter(_,_,9).
filter([Y|T],V2,Row):-
    Y=:=0,
    NewRow is Row + 1,
    filter([Y|T],V2,NewRow).

filter([Y|T],V2,Row):-
    Y=\=0,
    nth(Row,[Y|T],X1),
    nth(Row,V2,X2),
    X1=:=X2,
    NewRow is Row + 1,
    filter([Y|T],V2,NewRow).


nth(1,[X|_],X).  
nth(N,[_|T],R):- M is N-1, nth(M,T,R).

I know there are better ways of doing the function, for example comparing the first element of the first to the nth of the second and delete the head of the first with recursion but I just want to know why I'm not getting true or false, or any "return" value at all.

Can someone help me?, got it working

New code:

filter([],R,_,R).
filter([Y|T],V2,Row,R):-
Y=:=0,
NewRow is Row + 1,
filter(T,V2,NewRow,R).

filter([Y|T],V2,Row,R):-
Y=\=0,
nth(Row,V2,X2),
Y=:=X2,
NewRow is Row + 1,
filter(T,V2,NewRow,R).

Example of expected behaviour:

permutation([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8],X),filter([1,2,3,4,0,0,0,0],X,1,R).
X = R, R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] ;
X = R, R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 7] ;
X = R, R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8] ;
X = R, R = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 6] .

Now i can get all the permutations that starts with 1,2,3,4. If someone knows a better way to achieve the same, plz share, but i already got what i needed =).

share|improve this question
    
Thank you to those reviewers who accepted both 'my' edits (the second being an OP edit that clashed in time with my first) - the others, shame on you! –  pnuts May 11 '13 at 0:19
    
I dont understand what happened, but i added the nth predicate, but its missing some text i added O.o, pnuts do you know whats wrong with my code ? –  Leonardo R.R. May 11 '13 at 0:32
    
Sorry, I was only helping with translation I know ZILCH about PROLOG (and very little about anything else)! If you would like a further edit please do feel free to make it. –  pnuts May 11 '13 at 0:34
    
The third argument its just a counter, i know the lgenth of V1 and v2 will always be 8, and the base case is there, its after the filter, i just changed the 0 for 1 –  Leonardo R.R. May 11 '13 at 1:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

seems like could be a perfect task for maplist/3

filter(L1, L2, _) :-
  maplist(skip_or_match, L1, L2).

skip_or_match(E1, E2) :- E1 == 0 ; E1 == E2.

yields

?- permutation([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8],X),filter([1,2,3,4,0,0,0,0],X,_).
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 7] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 6] ;
...

We could do that more useful, using Prolog facilities - namely, use an anonymus variable to express don't care.

Then filter/N is a simple application of maplist:

?- permutation([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8],X),maplist(=,[1,2,3,4,_,_,_,_],X).
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 7] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 6] ;
...
share|improve this answer
    
Thx, i knew i was forgetting something, maplist does what i needed the right way –  Leonardo R.R. May 11 '13 at 14:52

Your code always tests the first item of the filtering list for being zero. For example, look at the case when you're checking second value:

filter([0,3,0,5,0,0,0,0], [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8], 2).

This call will perform the following unifications:

# first case: obvious fail…
filter([0,3,0,5,0,0,0,0], [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8], 2) =\= filter(_, _, 9).

# second case:
filter([0,3,0,5,0,0,0,0], [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8], 2) = filter([Y|T],V2,Row).
# unification succeeds with substitutions:
    Y = 0
    T = [3,0,5,0,0,0,0]
    V2 = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
    Row = 2
# and what happens next?
    Y =:= 0 # success!

You probably wanted here to check whether second element of [Y|T] is zero; instead, you're checking the first one. If you want to fix it without changing the rest of your code, you should instead perform comparisons to X1:

filter(V1,V2,Row):-
    nth(Row, V1, X1),
    X1 =:= 0,
    NewRow is Row + 1,
    filter(V1,V2,NewRow).

filter(V1,V2,Row):-
    nth(Row,V1,X1),
    X1=\=0,
    nth(Row,V2,X2),
    X1=:=X2,
    NewRow is Row + 1,
    filter(V1,V2,NewRow).

Also, there's one more thing that I think you might not be getting yet in Prolog. If a predicate fails, Prolog indeed prints false and stops computation. But if a predicate succeeds, there are two cases:

  • If there were no variables in your query, Prolog prints true.
  • If there were any variables in your query, Prolog does not print true. Instead, it prints values of variables instead. This also counts as true.

In your case Prolog actually “returns” true from your predicate—except that because you have used variables in your query, it printed their value instead of printing true.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, just solved it, i will add the code and a example, but i actually wanted to compare to check if the first element of V1 is 0, because in that case i ignore it and move on to compare the next element, i only care for those elements != 0 –  Leonardo R.R. May 11 '13 at 1:42

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