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I am working on a very small library which will allow the end user to create "commands" which can be called by providing a string in another function like call("this_function",params);

I have done it all nicely, but the code to use it is ugly:

#define begin(x) \
    class x\
    {\
        x(){/*some code*/}\
        void some_function_the_macro_has_to_make()

#define end() \
    }

begin(hello_world)
{
    /*do something*/
}
end();

I have no idea how I would insert code between two snippets with macros, is this even possible?

(And I have even less knowledge about how to accomplish this without a macro..)

So I could do:

#define begin(x){y} \
    class x\
    {\
        x(){/*some code*/}\
        void some_function_the_macro_has_to_make()\
        {\
            y\
        }\
    };

begin(hello_world)
{
    /*do something*/
}

?

If not, is it possible without a macro but some special C++ stuff?


Edit:
the following example seems to work but it doesn't achive what I want in the second code sample in this question:

#define begin(x,y) \
    class x\
    {\
        x(){/*some code*/}\
        void some_function_the_macro_has_to_make()\
        {\
            y\
        }\
    };

begin(hello_world,
        int x = 0;
        std::cout << "x:" << x;
);

    //it would be preffered to have:
begin(hello_world)
{
        int x = 0;
        std::cout << "x:" << x;
}
share|improve this question
    
how about #define begin(x,y) ? –  sluki May 11 '13 at 0:00
    
hm that seems to work if you put the code after ,, but is it possible to make it behave like the second example? (what I want to achieve) #define CMD(x)y begin(x,y) CMD(second){int x = 0;} doesn't seem to compile (not even mentioning the programmer would need ) at the end which would look even more ugly) –  user1182183 May 11 '13 at 0:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am not sure I entirely understand your objective, but I think you want to avoid using an end() macro.

If that is the case, you can change your macro to define the method outside of the class declaration.

#define begin(x) \
    class x\
    {\
        x(){/*some code*/}\
        void some_function_the_macro_has_to_make(); \
    }; \
    inline void x::some_function_the_macro_has_to_make ()

Now, you can use it like this:

begin(hello_world) {
    int x = 0;
    std::cout << "x:" << x;
}

I recommend, though, that you consider using a template with a functor template argument instead. The code will likely be more intelligible to the person that has to maintain the code after you move on to the next big thing. Something along the lines of:

template <typename ACTION>
class ActionT
{
    ACTION action_;
public:
    ActionT() : action_() {/*some code*/}
    void some_function () { action_(); }
};

struct hello_world_action {
    void operator () () {
        int x = 0;
        std::cout << "x: " << x << std::endl;
    }
};

typedef ActionT<hello_world_action> hello_world;

This extends more naturally if the class has more than one action to perform.

share|improve this answer
    
YES YES YEs, My Hero <3 at least for my case, other users who search in google might want to know how to do what I want but iwth actual code being inserted into the class definition, if you can answer that, that would be an + for the users who search and get here, but as far as I need it, this is the way to go for me. –  user1182183 May 11 '13 at 0:16
    
As for the functor template thingy, could you make a example? this is the mini library I wrote: zcmd.cpp zcmd.hpp and usage if that helps to make the example.. –  user1182183 May 11 '13 at 0:22

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