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I have list of arrays:

List<HeaderItem> _headerItems = new List<HeaderItem>();


class HeaderItem
{
    private string[] _headers = new string[6];

    public string this[int index]
    {

        get
        {
            return _headers[index];
        }
        set
        {
            _headers[index] = value;
        }
    }
}

Each of the 6 items in the array represent a level in the hierarchy. If all items matched in array position 0 then a single root level node would exist.

So,

A,B,C

A,B,D

B,C,D

B,D,E

would produce:

A

....B

........C

........D

B

....C

........D

....D

........E

etc....

Currently my solution is pretty hacked up and although it works I am trying to come up with a "cool" way of doing it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can achieve that by calling a print method recursively providing it with the subset of items to be printed and depth of the tree printed so far. I amended your class to contain a Length property so that the caller does not have to always assume it is 6. Also I added a constructor to make my initialization easy. Probably it wouldn't make sense in your code.

public class HeaderItem
{
    public HeaderItem(string headers)
    {
        _headers = headers.ToCharArray().Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray();
    }

    private string[] _headers = new string[6];

    public int Length
    {
        get { return _headers.Length; }
    }

    //...
}

This is the print method. See how it does grouping and then calls itself recursively:

private static void PrintHeaders(IEnumerable<HeaderItem> headerItems, int depth = 0)
{
    var result =
        headerItems.Where(h => h.Length > depth)
                   .GroupBy(h => h[depth], h => h,
                              (k, g) => new {Key = k, Items = g})
                   .OrderBy(g => g.Key);

    foreach (var pair in result)
    {
        Console.Write(new string('.', depth)); // change here to add more dots
        Console.WriteLine(pair.Key);
        PrintHeaders(pair.Items, depth + 1);
    }
}

And this is how you can begin calling it:

PrintHeaders(_headerItems);

For testing, this is my Main method:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("abc"));
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("abd"));
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("acd"));
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("ace"));
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("bce"));
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("bcd"));
    _headerItems.Add(new HeaderItem("bef"));

    PrintHeaders(_headerItems);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

And this is the result:

a
.b
..c
..d
.c
..d
..e
b
.c
..d
..e
.e
..f
share|improve this answer
    
You da man. Thanks for that one, spot on my friend. –  Joe G May 11 '13 at 4:11

When ever making tree always create a list of entity within that entity like this

class HeaderItem
{
    private string[] _headers = new string[6];

    private List<HeaderItem> _items;

    public string this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return _headers[index];
        }
        set
        {
            _headers[index] = value;
        }
    }

    public List<HeaderItem> Items
    {
        get
        {
            if (_items == null)
                _items = new List<HeaderItem>();
            return _items;
        }            
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I definitely see your point however I just need to print this right to the screen so my solution should not require an object model to accomplish. Much agreed to your point with the subclassing. Anything on a quick cruncher routine? –  Joe G May 11 '13 at 2:39

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