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This question already has an answer here:

I need to return a error text from sub in $!. But simple

 $! = "Error: Something is wrong!";

doesn't work, it doesn't change $!. How can I do it?

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marked as duplicate by Brian Roach, mob, amon, dcastro, Nemanja Boric Mar 2 '14 at 12:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
$! contains what went wrong... – squiguy May 11 '13 at 3:47
    
Ok $!="This is wrong"; – michaeluskov May 11 '13 at 3:48
5  
You should consider "$!" to be read-only. It's the moral equivalent of perror: linux.die.net/man/3/perror – paulsm4 May 11 '13 at 3:50
    
@Brian Roach, The answers to that question may have useful, applicable advice, but the question is very different, and the answers to that question don't answer this question. It's not even close to being a duplicate. – ikegami May 11 '13 at 4:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two options.

First, Errno::AnyString.

Second, don't do it. $! is special, and should denote errno. Use $YourModule::Error (or whatever) if you need to communicate special errors.

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$! is reflection of the C library var errno (a number) and the error message it represents (as obtained using strerror or similar).

You can't change the string because that's a generated value, but you can change the number.

$ perl -E'say $!=$_ for 1..10'
Operation not permitted
No such file or directory
No such process
Interrupted system call
Input/output error
No such device or address
Argument list too long
Exec format error
Bad file descriptor
No child processes

Your code isn't trying to set errno, so it should be using its own variable instead of messing with $! (or throw an exception using die).

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