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I'm writing a path profiling tools, and i use jdt Astparser to modify the source code If i want to add some codes after every original lines and let them to be atomic operations and don't change the behavior of the source code . just like this: original source code:

int a = 0;
int b = 0;
a = b;

after manipulation

synchronized (lock) {
int a = 0;  //original code
//my code
//....
//end
}
synchronized (lock) {
int b = 0;  //original code
//my code
//....
//end
}
synchronized (lock) {
a = b;  //original code
//my code
//....
//end
}

but it changes the variable scope, the variable a and b are no longer global and the code can't compile.

Is there any method to combine the variable declaration and codes i inserted after that to let them become atomic operation and don't change the variable scope?

...and sorry for my english :)

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Brian Roach, fglez, Beryllium, Raedwald, Bosko Mijin Mar 4 '14 at 23:09

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
If you don't want them in the scope of the block, don't declare them in the block. – Brian Roach May 11 '13 at 4:15
    
I want the variable declaration and code i inserted after to be atomic operation so it must be in the block – kaze13 May 11 '13 at 4:18
    
@Brian Roach see above. – kaze13 May 11 '13 at 5:17

Don't declare them in the block. This has nothing to do with the initialisation itself.

int a, b;

synchronized (lock) {
    a = 0;
}
synchronized (lock) {
    b = 0;

}
synchronized (lock) {
    a = b; 
}

I'm not sure why you're using three synchronized blocks, though, unless the code is much more complex than your example suggests.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually i want to add some code after "int a, b;" and they should be atomic – kaze13 May 11 '13 at 6:08
    
Writing int a, b; simply declares them in the current scope. You can access them from your synchronized blocks, and do whatever operations you want. – sapi May 11 '13 at 6:24

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