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I am looking for free and/or open source requirements management tools. Does anyone have any experience with these tools and can recommend one or two? Thanks.

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this is such a basic need it is shocking that there isn't aren't many tools in this space. probably they can't manage requirements for requirements management tools?!? –  Kinjal Dixit Sep 11 '11 at 6:11
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16 Answers

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The most basic needs of any project are the project context (boundaries and scope of what will be developed or altetered), the objectives, the requirements that fulfill those objectives, a functional decomp / process map / activity diagram, and the ERD. One of the best tools for most of those items is Word. This is the easiest to update and makes stuff pretty for the execs.

Otherwise, yEd is a good diagramming tool. There is also a comprehensive UML modeling tool called StarUML that is a full fledged UML modeling tool and will output Use Cases to MS Word. It also will generate C# for you as well. The diagram is generates can be exported to .jpg as the diagram format is unto itself. It works well for quick modeling of activities, classes and interactions.

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'One of the best tools for most of those items is Word.' speechless –  mozboz Feb 18 '09 at 18:06
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my mind has been blown. I didn't know people thought this way anymore –  Matt Briggs Feb 18 '09 at 19:29
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Requirements management is also linked to development activities you know. In which case Word documents are close to useless. –  Rollo Tomazzi Apr 4 '09 at 20:00
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There are so many pieces of the requirements process which Word is completely inadequate for. From the functional decomposition of the screens, linking information to UI elements on those screens, describing cross-functional requirements, iterating over multiple versions as requirements evolve, the storage and management of all the requirement documents that get produced.... the list goes on and on. Collaboration, workflow, approval, association to design and components - none of these aspects are catered to by a generic word-processing app. I'm sorry, but Word is so very far from the answer. –  Marchy Aug 8 '10 at 3:10
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@Justin: the ability to recognize a spectacularly wrong answer does not imply the ability to provide the correct answer. Example: "Q - How do I keep my beloved grandmother from dying? A - Force feed her a bottle of vodka." –  Dave Jan 28 '13 at 22:14
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I found the Open Source Requirements Management Tool (that's its name) on SourceForge.

After installing, I found that it was a client-server model tool, which I don't really like. In order to use it, I must start a server application and connect to it with the client. Although once I did that, it appeared to be a decent application, but not really what I was looking for.

However, I have yet to find anything better, so I might use it.

Update January 04, 2012: OSRMT has an upgrade path now to aNimble Platform. Still open source and available via SourceForge. Just follow the link above.

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Not updated in the last 2 years... –  Rollo Tomazzi Apr 4 '09 at 20:05
    
The community is quite active from what I see. I'm installing now and will update :-) –  Etamar Laron Apr 2 '10 at 17:22
    
@Etamar - How'd you go with this tool? –  Andrew May 9 '10 at 23:22
    
What's wrong with client-server model? can you explain what you mean? –  dm76 Oct 17 '13 at 10:49
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Our company, iConcur Software, has developed Axiom, a free (soon to be open source) requirements management system. Features of Axiom include:

  • An innovative and powerful rich-text editor that allows documents to be rapidly composed from collections of requirements.
  • A seamless integration with Microsoft Word.
  • A templating system that gives users the ability to create requirements, use cases, tasks, change requests, test cases or any other artifact that development teams might need.
  • Powerful business intelligence reporting.
  • The ability to create traces and other custom links between requirements and other artifacts.

Axiom is 100% free for an unlimited number of users.

A full tour of Axiom features can be found here: http://www.iconcur-software.com/axiom.html.

Also, feel free download the client and server from: http://www.iconcur-software.com/download.html

Brent Wilson
iConcur Software

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No OS X support. –  sorin Apr 13 '11 at 20:15
    
Brent, How does your product compare to DOORS? –  gonzobrains Jun 26 '11 at 16:53
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If this is open source, then where can I get the source? A google search of the website for source turns up nothing. –  sage Apr 10 '12 at 16:17
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There is still no evidence of an open-source version (or of the project being open-sourced). What is the status of this, @Brent? –  Alex Hirzel Feb 25 '13 at 19:20
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I tried this product recently and couldn't even log in as the admin. I tried calling, emailing, and opening a support ticket but no response after a week. Is iConcur still alive? –  gonzobrains Sep 26 '13 at 18:07
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There is a tool called rmtoo you might want to look at. It's new and currently provides only a small set of features, but it works and it is easy expandable.

Andre

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UNICASE

UNICASE is the first free and open-source tool that met my demands. It allows to collect and describe scenarios, use cases, requirements (and more ...) and enables the user to create references between them. It also provides support for versioning and collaboration.

At first it is weird to get started, but once you created a project skeleton it is easy to add new requirements, use cases, etc.

It also allows integrated editing of UML diagrams which is an advantage, for example, because an actor in a use-case diagram can reference the same actor as a scenario description


Exerpt from the website:

UNICASE is a CASE-Tool integrating models from the different development acitivities, such as requirements, use cases, UML models, schedules, bug and feature models into a unified model. This unified model is highly traceable by design

http://unicase.org/

enter image description here

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If you don't need overly polished output, you may try a Wiki. I liked TWiki, because it allows you to structure pages with attributes (forms in their speak). So you can define your templates for requirements, use cases, dictionnary entries etc. You get revision control for free and publishing with PDF is good enough for many cases

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If you liked TWiki, check out Foswiki. Same philosophy, nearly 100% compatible with TWiki content, a little more secure, and many more Plugins and core activity. –  Soronthar Mar 23 '11 at 19:26
    
Thank you Soronthar. TWiki is no longer free -- it's paid software. Foswiki is a fork of TWiki that was made in response to TWiki becoming paid and angering all of the open source contributors. –  AresAvatar Sep 7 '11 at 17:43
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The problem with Requirements Management Tools is a lot ( most? ) organisations after installing them then seem to think that that's it, Requirements are now sorted.

IMO the best tool for requirements management is training and experience of your stakeholders, keeping the text of the reqs and even tying them to tasks is actually usually the least troublesome bit.

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I'm thinking that you are right, coupled with a version control system that can handle binary files well, a good spreadsheet app, and a good document editor (OpenOffice covers both for me quite well). –  Thomas Owens Oct 2 '08 at 23:00
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You're missing the point. The real question is how all of these bits and pieces integrate with one another, without having someone(s) working full time just on that. Very close to a management nightmare –  Rollo Tomazzi Apr 4 '09 at 19:56
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-1. I have the Training and experiance, and no tool. Have you got any idea how much time I spend managing the requirements cross references (User / Software / Test). –  mattnz Jan 11 '12 at 7:47
    
-1 Using dedicated systems to speed up things is always beneficial. If you have the proper tools, you can focus more on the contents of requirements, than you need to focus on managing the requirements. The less you are troubled with managing the requirements, because a tool does it for you, the better. –  Mike de Klerk Sep 10 '13 at 10:36
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A great tool for requirements management is QPack. Actually it provides a full application lifecycle management, including also testing and defect tracking.

They have a free edition designed for small teams

These are the links, hope it helps!

http://orcanos.com/Requirements%5Fmanagement.htm

David

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... tried it. It does not co-exist with a previously installed SQL Server. So it basically means it cannot be installed on a machine with Visual Studio installed!! Had to remove it after two hours trying out and searching support for an answer. –  Etamar Laron Apr 2 '10 at 17:14
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You could use Drupal for pretty much everything requiring collaboration. We have used for requirements gathering , bug tracking , doc sharing etc.

Just create the proper book / folder / content structure and start adding stuff.

It takes 2 hours to set up on any Linux or Windows box.

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Check out Code Roller whose community edition is free forever and unfettered by number of users or time. Code Roller offers more than just requirements management. It provides management for the complete life cycle of the application, from requirements to analysis to design to implementation to testing to deployment. Automation tools facilitate converting deliverables from each phase to the next without losing that relationship so you can always track back through the thread of decisions that were made. In addition to requirements management, you get change management, release management, document management, compliance management, the works.

Sounds too complicated? Not really. Check out this introduction and see for yourself.

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Code Roller No More 2012-06-30 The Code Roller project is being shuttered. View this blog on why we are pulling the plug on SLDC based PM. New user registration has already been disabled. You can still download your requirements information until the end of August. Thanks for your interest and support. If you are still looking for software development project managment tools, then check out GForge or Trac for open source projects that you can host or BaseCamp or Zoho Projects for online sites that provide this functionality for you. (dynamicalsoftware.com/cr/prod/mobile.php?id=26) –  Richard A Aug 15 '12 at 4:47
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I don't know of ANY good open source requirements tools - even OSRMT is a dead project. However, I've recently been looking at a COTS product from a company called BluePrint Systems. It's unbelievable. I've worked with other products in the past, and none come close to this one. Easy to use: Excel-like requirements entry, and Drag-and-Drop Process diagrams (like Visio) with swim-lanes, 3-clicks to create a traceability relationship, built-in documentation templates, auto-flowchart design of Use Case scenarios... I could go on, but you'd think I'm a sales rep.

Of course, if budget is a factor, you probably don't want to waste your time. :) EVERYTHING in this space is expensive, including this one. Stick with your basic office suite to document everything manually like we've all done for years. A wiki (or a portal package like Drupal) is a good choice as a collaborative option - I'd recommend DokuWiki, because of the OpenDocument plugin that allows you to export pages to office-suite readable document files when you're done. Good Luck!

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I actually really like the BluePrint Systems product but they don't say anywhere how much it costs per license which makes me think that this might be very expensive. –  the_drow Dec 2 '10 at 15:37
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http://www.rallydev.com/

The community edition is free for up to 10 users. This is was well rated in the Forrester report. it's for agile projects - lots of agile coaching in there if you're not familiar.

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If you have a small team, take a look at www.artifactsoftware.com. It's free for 5 users, web-based (no install), and includes project planning, gantt charts, change management, test management, and defect management. Since everything is in one tool, you can trace requirements through the entire life cycle.

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This seems to be $120usd/year per user –  Eric Fossum Oct 25 '12 at 18:25
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Seems like there isn't any strong answer to this question. I've used some of the commercial tools (Doors, etc..) and some in-house alternatives and never been impressed. Maybe the answer is that you don't need a tool if you have good bug/issue tracking?

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It REALLY depends. If you have relatively static requirements, then defect tracking systems may be okay. But for large projects with requirements flying in and out, and tracability needed, it will usually not suffice. Not to mention if you need pretty-printing and book-like publishing. –  Etamar Laron Apr 2 '10 at 14:34
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Have you tried testlink ?

Is test oriented but can manage a lot of things around test and requirements.
Some correlation, versioning, test plan, inventory, platform and build.

Actualy i'm testing it in the spare time, living out the ORRIBLE interface, with features of the software appears ONLY when some requirements or test is in a fixed state (like a point and click graphic adventure :), it's seem realy customizable.

soon i hope, i can made to you more info.

my 2 cents.

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Why does everyone seem to only associate requirements management with software development. It is a discipline applicable to any project/product development, and it seems as if it is still as poorly understood as it was when I last had something to do with this area around 10 years ago.

Those people who seem to think all that is required is some sort of word processor leave me speechless, as do those who see requirements managementas document driven. Exactly the reverse is true - a requirements document should be the product of the requirements process.

Probably the best tool I have have seen is:

http://www.serena.com/products/dimensions-rm-requirements-management/index.html

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That tool is not free. –  Thomas Owens May 6 '10 at 11:35
    
and its the worst tool I've used for ages. Think PVCS with a (broken) requirements management addon. The Serena salesman who gave us the demo did say it'll take 6 months to configure it, and we have 3 Serena consultant on-site at the moment trying to do that - I think its beating them. Even our partners have changed their minds about how pants DOORS is after using Dimensions RM. –  gbjbaanb May 6 '10 at 22:07
    
What problems do you have with DOORS? –  gonzobrains Jun 26 '11 at 16:55
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