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I am currently making a custom Minecraft Server launcher in Java and have got to an early stage where I'd actually like buttons to do something. I managed to get one button to respond (the start button) but as soon as I put in a second if statement to make the stop button respond, the start button which worked previously now does not. I cannot test the stop button because it is disabled by default. When I switched the if statements around (putting the stopBtn actionlistener first) the start button worked again, but the stop button does not. Please can someone have a look at the code and help?

package custommcserver;

import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

class Window extends JFrame implements ActionListener
{
    JPanel mainPnl = new JPanel(new GridLayout(2,1));
    JPanel propPnl = new JPanel();
    JButton startBtn = new JButton("Start");
    JButton stopBtn = new JButton("Stop");
    JButton propBtn = new JButton("Properties");

    public Window()
    {
        super("Custom Minecraft Server Launcher") ;
        setSize(500,200) ; 
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE) ;
        add(mainPnl) ;
        mainPnl.add(startBtn);
        mainPnl.add(stopBtn);
        mainPnl.add(propBtn);
        stopBtn.setEnabled(false);
        startBtn.addActionListener(this);
        stopBtn.addActionListener(this);
        propBtn.addActionListener(this);
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) 
    {

        if (event.getSource() == stopBtn);
        {
             stopBtn.setEnabled(false);
             startBtn.setEnabled(true);
        }

         if (event.getSource() == startBtn);
         {
             stopBtn.setEnabled(true);
             startBtn.setEnabled(false);
        }

      }
 }
share|improve this question
1  
If you have used a good IDE like IntelliJ, then the IDE would have automatically pointed out the error to you. You should consider using an IDE from now onwards to get rid of these typos. –  Extreme Coders May 11 '13 at 8:42
    
@ExtremeCoders personally I prefer eclipse to IntelliJ because of its simplicity and easy use. I think that would be better for the OP –  imulsion May 11 '13 at 8:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have put semi-colons after the if statements. Take them away:

if (event.getSource() == stopBtn)
        {
             stopBtn.setEnabled(false);
             startBtn.setEnabled(true);
        }

         if (event.getSource() == startBtn)
         {
             stopBtn.setEnabled(true);
             startBtn.setEnabled(false);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I'm quite new to Java so it's always good to learn from your mistakes. I will try to remember this from now on. –  Roboguy99 May 11 '13 at 8:36
1  
@user2372416 no worries, I'm always ready to help out. We all make these kind of mistakes. Since it worked, please consider accepting my answer. –  imulsion May 11 '13 at 8:37
    
Early in my career I spent some time trying to optimise some embedded code, before realising I had made this mistake. Since then, I've always included the braces in if statements. (And put the opening brace on the same line, which is the Java convention. Shame the compiler doesn't enforce it.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 11 '13 at 10:04
    
@TomHawtin-tackline I always put braces around if statements now, but I put them on separate lines. So I have the if statement, a brace on a newline, the command if condition is true, then another brace on another new line. I find it helps to improve my code readability. BTW, the compiler will never enforce that because the compiler reads Java code ignoring newlines and whitespace. So to the compiler, it doesn't matter. –  imulsion May 12 '13 at 8:06
    
@imulsion When I said compiler, I really mean the Java Language Specification. / I think the most important thing for readability is consistency. That is consistency independently of where the code comes from. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 13 '13 at 23:40

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