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I have the following snippet:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys

mypath = "D:\inetpub\wwwroot"

if mypath:
        try:
                print "Path: %s" % mypath
                if mypath.find("/"):
                        print "OS: Linux/Unix"
                elif mypath.find(":"):
                        print "OS: Windows"
                else:
                        print "OS: Unknown"
        except:
                print "Error"
else:
        print "[?] OS detection failure."

execution output:

$ python test.py
Path: D:\inetpub\wwwroot
OS: Linux/Unix

What am I doing wrong? I'm getting the opposite result as I expect. Or is there a better way to do this? "/" -> Linux/Unix and ":" -> Windows

share|improve this question
    
If you want to detect the OS, why don't you read sys.platform directly? If it contains linux, then it's Linux. If it contains win32, then it's Windows. If it contains darwin, then it's Mac OS X. See stackoverflow.com/questions/446209/… for more. –  pts May 11 '13 at 9:06
    
this was just an example, I'm not relying on this to detect OS. –  bsteo May 11 '13 at 9:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys

mypath = "D:\\inetpub\\wwwroot"

if mypath:
        try:
                print "Path: %s" % mypath
                if mypath.find("/") >= 0:
                        print "OS: Linux/Unix"
                elif mypath.find(":"):
                        print "OS: Windows"
                else:
                        print "OS: Unknown"
        except:
                print "Error"
else:
        print "[?] OS detection failure."

You need to escape \ otherwise it will assume that the next character has a speacial meaning/binary representation (such as \n´,\t`).

or try:

mypath = r'D:\inetpub\wwwroot'

a better way is to do:

from os.path import abspath
print abspath('D:/inetpub/')

It will automaticly re-work your path to the system specific design, for instance / for linux and \ for Windows :)

or you can do:

import os
if os.name == 'nt':
    print 'Windows'
else:
    print 'Linux/Unix'
share|improve this answer
    
Python automatically does this (escapes the '\') if the escape sequence is invalid. –  Volatility May 11 '13 at 8:46
1  
Yepp but assuming this is stupid/lazy because you will end up with a \a or something similar one day and you'll wonder why :) –  Torxed May 11 '13 at 8:49

The problem is your use of str.find. str.find returns the index of a substring in a string, or -1 otherwise. Because -1 is True in a boolean context, you enter the if block. What you really want is the in operator:

>>> 'hello world'.find('foo')
-1
>>> bool(-1)
True
>>> 'foo' in 'hello world'
False

Your code now should therefore look like this:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys

mypath = r'D:\inetpub\wwwroot'  # use a raw string
if mypath:
    try:
        print 'Path:', mypath  # no need for formatting
        if '/' in mypath:
            print 'OS: Linux/Unix'
        elif ':' in mypath:
            print 'OS: Windows'
        else:
            print 'OS: Unknown'
    except:
        print 'Error'
else:
    print '[?] OS detection failure.'

Some suggestions:

  • Use the new str.format method when formatting. It is much more powerful, and is recommended over the old style formatting.
  • You shouldn't have a bare except - it's always a good idea to except specific exceptions, and allows for easy debugging if an unexpected error occurs.
share|improve this answer

You can use in

if "/" in mypath:
    print 'yay :)'

http://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#str.find

The find() method should be used only if you need to know the position of sub. To check if sub is a substring or not, use the in operator:

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