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I read about bitwise JavaScript operator here.

     9 (base 10) = 00000000000000000000000000001001 (base 2)
    14 (base 10) = 00000000000000000000000000001110 (base 2)
                   --------------------------------
14 ^ 9 (base 10) = 00000000000000000000000000000111 (base 2) = 7 (base 10)

Wondering how it is 9 for the below expression?

 '' ^ 9 
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Thanks for the edit @Rob W. I will be careful in future. –  rajakvk May 11 '13 at 10:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

^ is a bitwise operator operating on signed 32-bit integers.
If an operand is not a 32-bit integer, it's converted to a signed 32-bit integer.

The behaviour of ToInt32 is defined in section 9.5 of the specification as "Let number be the result of calling ToNumber on the input argument.". The details of ToNumber are explained here. In practical terms, ToNumber(x) is equivalent to +x.

Then, 9.5 continues: "If number is NaN, +0, −0, +∞, or −∞, return +0.".
The remaining steps of 9.5 boils down to "subtract/add 232 until the result is in the range [-231, 231-1]".

Applied to '' ^ 9:

'' ^ 9
// ToInt32, step 1: ToNumber
0 ^ 9
// Bitwise XOR
9

Applied to 'string' ^ 9:

'string' ^ 9
// ToInt32, step 1: ToNumber
NaN ^ 9
// ToInt32, step 2
0 ^ 9
// Bitwise XOR
9
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1  
excellent. Convincing answer. thanks. –  rajakvk May 11 '13 at 10:05

'' converts to the number. +'' === 0 and 0 ^ 9 = 9

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This answer is incomplete. + is not a "convert to integer" operation. So, although the answer seems plausible, it's missing fundamental intermediate steps. –  Rob W May 11 '13 at 9:49
    
thanks @Vitaliy Petrychuk. I tried with +'is not'^9 is also 9 but +'is not' is NaN –  rajakvk May 11 '13 at 9:51
    
it's not surprising that 'some arbitrary string' is not a number in general. –  mightyuhu May 11 '13 at 9:54
    
@mightyuhu agreed but it is reply to Vitaliy Petrychuk. +NaN^9 is also 9. But I'm trying to understand based on the explanation mention in the MDN link (please refer question) –  rajakvk May 11 '13 at 9:58

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