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I know template definitions should all go into the header file [1]. But what to do if I have both templates and non-templates in a class:

// cls.h
class cls {
public:
    template <typename U> void bar(U x);   // template
    void baz();                            // non-template
    template <typename V> class nest {
    };
};

// foo1.cpp
#include "cls.h" ...

// foo2.cpp
#include "cls.h" ...

Ideally I want to define bar and baz in the same file as they are so closely related.

  • But if I chuck all the implementation in the header, I'll end up multiply defining baz.
  • If I chuck all the implementation into a .cpp, then definitions for bar and nest can't be seen by foo1.cpp or foo2.cpp.

Do I have to split bar and baz between seperate files?

[1] Declaring templates as inline doesn't seem work for me on MSVC++ using NVCC to compile CUDA code.

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What you mean by declaring templates as inline? As per the current answer, define the non-templated baz as inline and it should work. –  Janick Bernet May 11 '13 at 10:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

But if I chuck all the implementation in the header, I'll end up multiply defining baz.

You can still mark the function definition for baz() as inline. That will allow you to put the definition of baz() in a header file without leading to multiple symbol definition errors.

If I chuck all the implementation into a .cpp, then definitions for bar and nest can't be seen by foo1.cpp or foo2.cpp.

If you know in advance what types your function template is going to be instantiated with, you can use explicit instantiations in the .cpp files that contain the definitions of your function templates.

template void cls::bar(int);

If none of the above options are OK for you, then you will have to give up this requirement:

Ideally I want to define bar and baz in the same file as they are so closely related.

And put the definition of member function templates in the header file, and the definition of non-template member functions in a .cpp file.

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Thanks - inlining the non-templated code does the trick. But will that cause bloat/longer compile times by having more stuff in the header? –  Milo Chen May 11 '13 at 10:43
    
And it also raises the question how exactly do compiler handle inline code - how are we able to multiply define inline functions? –  Milo Chen May 11 '13 at 10:44
    
Yes. But the alternative is to put baz in to the cpp. You can always put anything that is not templated in the cpp as you would normally do. –  Janick Bernet May 11 '13 at 10:44
    
Also, what if baz cannot be inlined (e.g. recursive calls to itself)? –  Milo Chen May 11 '13 at 10:48
    
@MiloChen: The inline keyword does not have anything to do with inlining in that sense. It is mostly a way to circumvent the One Definition Rule and allow putting definitions in header files. –  Andy Prowl May 11 '13 at 10:50

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