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I need a function that can take to according to the x-axis of symmetry of the matrix.

input (matrix[i][j]):

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9

output (matrix[i][j]):

7 8 9
4 5 6
1 2 3

How can i do this on the same matrix? How should I write the inverse function?

void inverse(.......)
 {
 ..
 ..
 ..
 }

int main(){
int **matrix, i, j, k, row, column;
cout << "Row and column:" ;
cin >> row >> column;
matrix = new int*[row];
for (i=0; i<row; ++i){
    matrix[i] = new int[column];
}
cout << "input elements of matrix: " << endl;
for(i=0; i<row; i++){
         for (j=0; j<column; j++){
             cin >> *(*(matrix+i)+j);
         }
}  

inverse (........);

for(i=0; i<row; i++){
         for (j=0; j<column; j++){
             cout << *(*(matrix+i)+j);
         }
         cout << endl;
}  
return 0;
}
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2  
It's probably not a good idea to call that function inverse. –  Joseph Mansfield May 11 '13 at 11:27
    
yes, it's probably, but I'm gonna check to call function with if statement. For example: cout << do you want inverse of matrix? ; –  notch May 11 '13 at 11:39
    
if (yes) call inverse function else do not call –  notch May 11 '13 at 11:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In this particular case, you can modify the loop to print the matrix backwards:

for(i = 0; i < row; i++) {

->

for(i = row - 1; i >= 0; i--) {

But if you want to actually do something to the data, my suggestion would be to refactor this code to use std::vector.

std::vector<std::vector<int> > matrix(numberOfRows, std::vector<int>(numberOfColumns));
// You can use std::vector<std::valarray<int> > matrix; alternatively.

You would then flip it simply by using an STL function:

std::reverse(matrix.begin(), matrix.end());

Edit:
Well, if you don't want to use std::vector for the time being and for this particular case, what you would do is this:

void flipMatrix(int** matrix, int rows, int columns) {
    int middle = rows/2; // I expect it to truncate for an odd number of rows.

    // Temporary row for swapping
    int* tempRow;

    for (int i = 0; i < middle; i++) {
        // swap rows
        tempRow = matrix[i];
        matrix[i] = matrix[rows - i - 1];
        matrix[rows - i - 1] = tempRow;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i don't know std::vector and i could not :( –  notch May 11 '13 at 11:55
    
is it like that ? void inverse(int row, int column){ std::vector<std::vector<int> > matrix(row); for (std::vector<std::vector<int> >::iterator i = matrix.begin(); i != matrix.end(); ++i) { matrix.push_back(std::vector<int>(column)); std::reverse(matrix.begin(), matrix.end()); }} –  notch May 11 '13 at 12:02
    
No. The code I showed your in there is only for initializing the matrix. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 11 '13 at 12:03
    
I have updated the answer to contain code that doesn't rely on std::vector. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 11 '13 at 12:05
    
Thanks a lot... –  notch May 11 '13 at 14:13

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