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I'm trying to export some data from core data to JSON. While the record count isn't particularly large (around 5000-15000 records), my data model is complex and there is a large amount of data in each record, so when I export this I exceed the allowable memory and iOS kills my app.

The steps i currently take are:

    1. I have a method that extracts all the data from cordata and stores it an `NSDictionary`
    2. I then write it to a file using an `NSOutputStream` and `NSJSONSerialization`
    3. I then zip up the file and send it via email

I'm pretty sure that steps 2 and 3 are fine from a max memory perspective as I stream the data. But the problem is that it gets killed in step 1 because I'm effectively pulling all the data out of CD and putting it in memory so I can pass it through NSOutputStream to NSJSONSerialization.

Anyone know how to not have to pull everything into memory, but still write to a single tree JSON file?

Update - More Detail
My data structure (simplified for clarify) looks like this. Given its not just a flat set of records but a hierarchal structure of objects with relationships i cant figure out how to pull the data out of core data in batches and fed tot he json streamer rather than all in memory to construct the json. my step one above is actually a collection of recursive methods that pull the data out of the core data entities and construct the 'NSDictionary'.

Folder {
    Folder {
        Word {
            details type 1
            details type 2
        }
        Word {
            details type 1
            details type 2
        }
    }
    Folder {
        Word {
            details type 1
            details type 2
        }
        Word {
            details type 1
            details type 2
        }
    }
    Word {
        details type 1
        details type 2
    }
}
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Are you using a different thread for this? Share some other details. Thanks. –  flexaddicted May 11 '13 at 12:40
    
yes its on a thread that is different to the main thread. i use my main thread to update progress for the user –  ngb May 12 '13 at 0:58
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3 Answers

Check the NSFetchRequest documentation. You will see two properties:

- (NSUInteger)fetchOffset;
– fetchBatchSize;

With use of these two properties you can restrict the number of returned NSManagedObjects to a given batch size.

Open a stream you can write too. Set up a loop to execute a fetch request. But set a batch size (x) and then update the fetch offset of the fetch request at the end of the loop code for the next iteration of the loop.

myFetchRequestObject.fetchOffset += x;

Process the batch of data objects writing the JSON data to your open stream before starting the next iteration of the loop.

When either no more objects are returned or the number of objects returned by the fetch are less than the batch size, exit your loop.

Close your stream.

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BTW, don't forget to enclose the contents of your loop with @autorelease{} so you are reclaiming memory as you go. –  TheBasicMind May 11 '13 at 15:21
    
i have all my methods enclosed in autoreleasepool. also everything with large for loops also enclosed in autoreleasepool. This approach words for flat data, ie lists of records. but how do you get it to work with hierarchical data? how do you get the next batch to insert into the correct position in the json data rather than just at the end of the file? i've updated my question with more info about my data. –  ngb May 12 '13 at 1:01
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[UPDATED TO IMPLEMENT LOW MEMORY SERIAL OUTPUT OF NESTED FOLDER HIERARCHY AS NESTED JSON OBJECT FILE]

Now you have provided more detail it's clear the original problem statement lacked sufficient detail for anyone to be able to provide an answer for you. Your issue is actually an age-old problem of how to traverse hierarchies in a memory efficient way combined with the fact the iOS JSON Library is quite light and doesn't easily support streamed writing of deep hierarchies).

The best approach is to use a technique known as the visitor pattern. For each of your NSManagedObject types shown above, implement a protocol called visitor, e.g. just the interface line for each object should look something like this:

@interface Folder : NSManagedObject <Visitable>

@interface Word : NSManagedObject <Visitable>

The visitor protocol should define a method call for all objects that comply with the protocol.

@protocol Visitable <NSObject>

- (void)acceptVisitor:(id<Visitor>)visitor;

@end

You are going to define a visitor object, which itself implements a visitor protocol.

@protocol Visitor <NSObject>

- (void)visitFolder:(Folder*)folder;
- (void)visitWord:(Word*)word;

@end



@interface JSONVisitor : NSObject <Visitor>

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSURL *streamURL;

- (void)startVisiting:(id<Visitable>)visitableObject;

@end


@implementation JSONVisitor

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSOutputStream *outputStream;

- (void)startVisiting:(id<Visitable>)visitableObject
{
    if ([visitableObject respondsToSelector:@selector(acceptVisitor:)] 
    {
        if (_outputStream == nil) 
        {
            // more code required set up your output stream
            // specifically as a JSON output stream.

            // add code to either set the stream URL here, 
            // or set it when the visitor object is instantiated. 

           _outputStream = [NSOutputStream outputStreamWithURL:_streamURL append:YES];
        }

        [_outputStream open];

        // Note 1a Bypass Apple JSON API which doesn't support
        // writing of partial objects (doing so is very easy anyway).
        // Write opening root object fragment text string to stream
        // such as:

        // {
        //     "$schema" : "http://myschema.com/draft-01/schema#Folder1",
        //     "name" : "Folder export",
        //     "created" : "2013-07-16T19:20:30.45+01:00",
        //     "Folders" : [

        [visitableObject acceptVisitor:self];

        // Note 1b write closing JSON  root object
        // e.g. 

        //     ]
        // }

        [_outputStream close];

    }
}


- (void)visitFolder:(Folder*)folder
{

    // Note 2a Bypass Apple JSON API which doesn't appear to support
    // writing of partial objects (Writing JSON is very easy anyway).
    // This next step would be best done with a proper templating system,
    // but for simplicity of illustration I'm suggesting writing out raw
    // JSON object text fragments.

    // Write opening JSON Folder object fragment text string to stream
    // e.g. 

    // "Folder" : { 

    if ([folder.folders count] > 1) {

        // Write opening folder array fragment to stream e.g.

        // "Folders" : [


        // loop through folder member NSManagedObjects here 
        // (note defensive checks for nulls not included).

        NSUInteger count = 0;

        for (Folder *nestedFolder in folder.folders)
        {
           if (count > 0) // print comma to output stream
           [nestedFolder acceptVisitor:self];
           count++;
        }

        // write closing folders array to stream

        // ]
    }

    if ([folder.words count] > 1) {

        // Write opening words array fragment to stream e.g.

        // "Words" : [

        // loop through Word member NSManagedObjects here 
        // (note defensive checks for nulls not included).

        NSUInteger count = 0;

        for (Word *nestedWord in folder.words)
        {
           if (count > 0) // print comma to output stream
           [nestedFolder acceptVisitor:self];
           count++;
        }

        // write closing Words array to stream

        // ]
    }

    // Print closing Folder object brace to stream (should only be followed
    // a comma if there are more members in the folder this object is contained by)
    // e.g.

    // },

    // Note 2b Next object determination code here. 
}

- (void)visitWord:(Word*)word
{
    // Write to JSON stream

    [NSJSONSerialization writeJSONObject:word toStream:_outputStream options: NSJSONWritingPrettyPrinted error:nil];
}

@end

This object is able to "visit" each object in your hierarchy and do some work work with it (in your case write it to a JSON stream). Note you don't need to extract to a dictionary first. You just work directly with the Core Data objects, making them visitable. Core Data contains it's own memory management, with faulting, so you don't have to worry about excessive memory usage.

This is the process. You instantiate the visitor object and then call it's start visiting method passing in the root Folder object of your hierarchy above. In that method, the visitor object "knocks on the door" of the first object to be visited by calling - (void)acceptVisitor:(id<Visitor>)visitor on the object to be visited. The root Folder then "welcomes the visitor in" by calling a method back on the visitor object matching it's own object type, e.g.:

- (void)acceptVisitor:(id<Visitor>)visitor
{
    if ([visitor respondsToSelector:@selector(visitFolder:)]) {
        [visitor visitFolder:self];
    }
}

This in turn calls the visitFolder: method on the visitor object which opens the stream writes the object as JSON and closes the stream. This is the important thing. This pattern may appear complex at first, but I guarantee, if you are working with hierarchies, once you have implemented it you will find it powerful and easy to manage.

To support low memory serial output of a deep hierarchy, I'm suggesting you write your own JSON Folder object to the output stream. Since JSON is so simple, this is much easier than it might at first appear. The alternative is to look for a JSON Library which supports low memory serialised writing of nested objects (I haven't used JSON much so don't know if such exists and is easy to use on iOS). The visitor pattern ensures you need have no more than one NSManagedObject instantiated to work on for each level of the hierarchy (though of course more will inevitably need to be instantiated as you implement hierarchy traversal logic) so this is light on memory usage.

I have given examples of the text string that needs to be written to the output stream. Best practice would dictate using a templating system for this rather than directly writing statically allocated strings. But personally I wouldn't worry about adopting the quick and dirty approach if your deadline is tight.

I've assumed your folder objects contain a folders property providing a set of additional folders. I have also assumed your Folders NSManagedObject class contains a words property containing a set of Words NSManagedObjects. Remember if you stay working in Core Data it will look after ensuring you keep a low memory footprint.

At the end of the visitFolder: method, you can use the following logic.

  1. Check if the Folder's contains any folders and visit each in turn if it does.

  2. If it contains no more folders, check if it contains any Words, and visit each in turn if it does.

Note the above code is the simplest construct for minimising the memory footprint. You may want to optimise it for performance by e.g. only doing an auto-release when a certain batch size is exceeded. However given the problem you have described, it will be best to implement the most memory efficient method first.

If you have polymorphic hierarchies - your on your own :) - get a book out and do some study -managing them is a grad degree in itself.

Clearly this code is untested!

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This is well written, a pattern i wasn't aware of and it makes sense from a maintainability perspective for traversing a hierarchy. It also makes sense if i'm traversing the hierarchy and dumping each object to a normal file. BUT if i stream to a json file like this i lose the hierarchical json relationships and instead just get a list of separate json objects listed one after the other, not structured in the syntactical json hierarchy. –  ngb May 12 '13 at 12:36
    
It's still good and this illustrates it's the right way to do it. The problem you have is the standard JSON classes in the iOS Library are relatively light and don't support sub-object member and value creation. You can either use another Library or roll your own solution. Personally I would just roll my own. It's easier to do than might at first be thought. I'll modify my answer to show how it can be done. –  TheBasicMind May 12 '13 at 13:12
    
Sorry had to rush. On the move. More work is needed on the answer. Hope it helps as is. Bear in mind in the visitFolder: method you nest calls by calling acceptVisitor: on nested objects. It's a powerful and simple to follow pattern. –  TheBasicMind May 12 '13 at 13:33
    
yea, my problem isn't so much the hierarchy traversal, but the getting stuff from core data into json with minimal peak memory usage. reading from a json file is a bit easier because i can read thru it using a memory mapped nsdata or stream it from the file using NSJSONSerialization which keeps it out of memory, but when writing json i can't figure out how to avoid the full json hierarchy in memory at some point. Still i've seen 2GB+ json files floating around - theres got to be a way without writing a custom "parse and search for the position in the json file and insert" –  ngb May 12 '13 at 14:18
    
Look again. The changes I've made will give you the full hierarchy with minimum memory footprint. You need to manually write out the opening and closing braces for your JSON Folder objects so the process is streamed, but that is easy to do (JSON being so simple). And it's easy to still use the iOS JSON library to write out non nesting Folder members. I'll modify it with further illustration when I get some more time. –  TheBasicMind May 12 '13 at 15:36
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

problem was that i had Enable Zombie Objects in the project schema turned on. For some reason this also carried through to the release build too.

turning it off fixed all my problems.

I ended up also using TheBasicMinds design pattern because its a cool design pattern...

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