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while understanding about auto_ptr, unique_ptr and shared_ptr I came to know that auto_ptr destructor uses delete, not delete[] where as unique_ptr does handle it properly.

auto_ptr<char> aptr(new char[100]);
unique_ptr<char []> uptr(new char[100]);

Anyhow auto_ptr is deprecated in c++11.And I know unique_ptr has much more functionality than auto_ptr. I have two questions related to this behavior

a) Why while designing behavior for auto_ptr by c++ standard library team has not considered it's disadvantages for arrays.

b) Also even though shared_ptr introduced in c++11 why it's implementation doesn't support deleting of array?

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possible duplicate of Why isn't there a std::shared_ptr<T[]> specialisation? –  Niko May 11 '13 at 13:31
    
You shouldn't be dealing with plain arrays in the first place. you can use a smart pointer to a std::array or a std::vector or a container of your choice. –  stefan May 11 '13 at 13:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why while designing behavior for auto_ptr by c++ standard library team has not considered it's disadvantages for arrays.

I can't comment on why auto_ptr wasn't very well designed; I can only observe that it wasn't, which is why it's now deprecated. It's not really worth worrying about; just pretend it never existed.

Also even though shared_ptr introduced in c++11 why it's implementation doesn't support deleting of array?

It supports arbitrary deleters, so you can do that; just slightly less conveniently than with unique_ptr:

std::shared_ptr<int> p(new int[42], std::default_delete<int[]>());
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+10 for just pretend it never existed. –  Mark B May 11 '13 at 13:49
    
@MarkB: How are you authorized to give 10 votes? –  Andrew Tomazos May 12 '13 at 6:31

Here is a good read on the tortured history of auto_ptr: http://www.aristeia.com/BookErrata/auto_ptr-update.html. The truth is, until rvalue references were invented, there was little hope of designing a bullet proof smart pointer with exception safety for standard containers.

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