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I basically have lots of files, generally in either .xls or .pdf format and I need to remove the first 8 characters from every file. the standard format is something like:

abc 123 restoffilenameiwanttokeep.pdf

I want to get rid of 'abc 123 ' and I have some code that seems to work for some file but not others, see below -

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
LFNFOR On

for %%a in (*.pdf) do (
set oldName=%%a
set newName=!oldName:~8!
Ren "%%a" "!newName!"
)
endlocal

for some files it works, for others it has removed up to 10 chars and I'm not sure why, is it due to the last char being a space? but if so why does it work with some and not others? its very perplexing.

I'm on Win XP and using a batch file to do this.

Any help would be appreciated.

Adam

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Can you provide examples of filenames that failed (i.e. that removed more than 8 characters). –  James Holderness May 11 '13 at 14:06
    
The first character of a file can't be a space (also the last). This set newName=!oldName:~8! removes eight chars .... –  Endoro May 11 '13 at 14:23
    
they all begin with the same layout abc 123 restoffilename. am i correct in thinking that 8 chars is enough? (3 letters, 3 numbers and 2 spaces) one that removed more than 8 basically did 10, and cut the word in half –  user2372970 May 11 '13 at 14:23
    
What was the name of "one"? –  Endoro May 11 '13 at 14:28
2  
Bet it isn't final :) I believe that the strange behaviour you're observing may be the new name being re-processed. Hence, a dir/b would seem to be in order... –  Magoo May 11 '13 at 14:54
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks like Peter Wright spotted the problem. You need to change your for loop to something like this:

for /f "delims=" %%a in ('dir /b *.pdf') do (
...
)

The /f option combined with the single quotes around the dir command, tells the for loop that it needs to execute that dir and loop over the results.

The "delims=" after the /f prevents it from matching any delimiters between words, otherwise the %%a would only return the first space separated word.

And the /b option on the dir command, just gives you a bare version of the directory listing with nothing but the names, since that is obviously all you're interested in.

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I think we may have a winner there, that seems to work ok, big thank you folks, this has definitely made my 12 hour shift more interesting than normal haha, love a good problem solve (I had spent ages looking before I posted here) –  user2372970 May 11 '13 at 16:17
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Suggestion for slightly better code (supports ! and ^):

@echo off &setlocal

for %%a in (*.pdf) do (
set "oldName=%%a"
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
set "newName=!oldName:~8!"
Ren "!oldname!" "!newName!"
endlocal
)
endlocal
share|improve this answer
    
ok, shall try it out, thank you the help by the way :-) –  user2372970 May 11 '13 at 14:45
    
As I see, tis also doesn't support ! or ^ in file names :(. –  Endoro May 11 '13 at 14:47
    
Arrgh, but now it does ! :) –  Endoro May 11 '13 at 14:50
1  
@Endoro: Due to the for-in-do bug which reprocesses files when they change name, use the long form of for /f to gather the filenames. –  foxidrive May 11 '13 at 16:03
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