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Is it possible to free a vtkSmartPointer before its destructor is called (end of scope of end of object lifetime)?

I have a class which draws a certain type of plot. Also a close() function which will close the current open window. But if the user calls it I want to free all remaining vtkSmartPointers the class has to free up some memory. Suppose he draws something, makes lots of calculations and then likes to draw it again with the same object. During these calculations I'd like to free up all unused memory.

Accoring to the documentation there isn't a function like std::unique_ptr::release, but is there any workaround?

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3  
How about just assigning a NULL pointer to it? –  Bwmat May 11 '13 at 15:41
    
Refer this link vtk.org/pipermail/vtkusers/2010-November/113500.html where David Gobbi says "When you reassign a smart pointer, its previous contents are automatically freed." So Bwmat is right if we assign NULL previous data will be deleted –  QT-ITK-VTK-Help Jul 16 '13 at 6:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Bwmat's answer works:

#include <iostream>
#include <vtkObject.h>
#include <vtkObjectFactory.h>
#include <vtkSmartPointer.h>
class vtkMyClass : public vtkObject {
public:
  vtkTypeMacro(vtkMyClass,vtkObject);
  void PrintSelf(ostream& os, vtkIndent indent){}
  static vtkMyClass * New();
protected:
  vtkMyClass();
  ~vtkMyClass();
};
vtkStandardNewMacro(vtkMyClass)
vtkMyClass::vtkMyClass() {
  std::cerr << "constructor called\n";
}
vtkMyClass::~vtkMyClass() {
  std::cerr << "destructor called\n";
}
int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
  std::cerr << __LINE__ << '\n';
  vtkSmartPointer< vtkMyClass > myObject;
  std::cerr << __LINE__ << '\n';
  myObject = vtkSmartPointer< vtkMyClass >::New();
  std::cerr << __LINE__ << '\n';
  myObject = NULL; // calls destructor
  std::cerr << __LINE__ << '\n';
  return 0;
}

outputs:

22
24
constructor called
26
destructor called
28
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