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Writing a general minimum function, Two questions came to my mind. The code works fine with any input type and different argument number:

namespace xyz
{

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto min(const T1 &a, const T2 &b) -> decltype(a+b)
{
    return a < b ? a : b;
}

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename ... Args>
auto min(const T1 &a, const T2 &b, Args ... args) -> decltype(a+b)
{
    return min(min(a, b), args...);
}

}

int main()
{
    cout << xyz::min(4, 5.8f, 3, 1.8, 3, 1.1, 9) << endl;
    //                   ^        ^           ^
    //                   |        |           |
    //                 float    double       int
}

 

  • Is there a better replacement for decltype(a+b)? I thing there's a standard class which I can't remember, something like decltype(std::THE_RESULT<a,b>::type).

  • The returned type of that decltype(std::THE_RESULT<a,b>::type)is const & or not ?

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1  
It seems odd to me that you allow a and b to be different types. This opens the door for all sorts of nonsensical comparisons, like min(42, "three"). Why not require both parameters (and the return value) all be of the same type? –  Adrian McCarthy May 11 '13 at 14:15
    
@AdrianMcCarthy: "For arithmetic types, the common type may also be viewed as the type of the (possibly mixed-mode) arithmetic expression such as T0() + T1() + ... + Tn()". So I think, it's prohibited to use min(42, "three"). It makes compile error. –  deepmax May 11 '13 at 14:29
    
By the way, there's an article on reproducing the good parts of the macro versions using templates. It's surprisingly a lot to do. –  chris May 11 '13 at 14:30
    
@MM.: Yes, it will get compiler errors for some combinations, but there's also the risk that it'll apply unexpected conversions to one or both of the types to come up with a non-intuitive common type. Consider a mixed int/float comparison that would return a float. Some ints can't be exactly represented in a float. It would be weird for a min(myint, myfloat) to return a value that doesn't exactly match one of the parameters. –  Adrian McCarthy May 11 '13 at 14:41
    
@AdrianMcCarthy: Almost agree, but we're daily using these conversions for example myint + myfloat and it's up to the programmer to handle it –  deepmax May 13 '13 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

std::common_type(c++11):

For non-specialized std::common_type, the rules for determining the common type between every pair T1, T2 are exactly the rules for determining the return type of the ternary conditional operator where T1 and T2 are the types of its second and the third operands.

and

For arithmetic types, the common type may also be viewed as the type of the (possibly mixed-mode) arithmetic expression such as T0() + T1() + ... + Tn().

Not sure about const&, but you could play with std::remove_cv and std::remove_reference (and std::is_reference to find out the answer).

In fact, here's a list of type support utilities. Knock yourself out.

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Thanks ... I added a third related question. Would you mind taking a look at it? –  deepmax May 11 '13 at 14:37
2  
@MM. That will work but is not completely what you want I think. For (1,2,1.1) that will return an int. decltype(min(1, 2)). You can try to cover the whole thing like decltype(min(min(a, b), args...)) but that doesn't work with gcc right now. I think it is a bug. –  Named May 11 '13 at 14:40
    
@Named: Yes, I tested it and you're right. –  deepmax May 11 '13 at 14:42
1  
@MM. Also const Args& .... otherwise you will have cv issues. –  Named May 11 '13 at 14:47

After the answer and worth comments I did it as below:

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto min(const T1 &a, const T2 &b) 
-> typename std::common_type<const T1&, const T2&>::type
{
    return a < b ? a : b;
}

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename ... Args>
auto min(const T1 &a, const T2 &b, const Args& ... args)
-> typename std::common_type<const T1&, const T2&, const Args& ...>::type
{
    return min(min(a, b), args...);
}
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