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Is it possible to silence a function? For example:

#include <stdio.h>
int function(){
  printf("BLAH!");
  return 10;

}
int main(){
  printf("%d", silence( function()) );
return 0;
}

And instead of:

BLAH!
10

I would get:

10

Is it possible? If positive how to do it?

share|improve this question
3  
Don't call the function... What is your intention? – bash.d May 11 '13 at 14:52
1  
It's software, almost anything is possible. Do you want a function? Or is a preprocessor method acceptable? How about modifying code at runtime? – Carl Norum May 11 '13 at 14:52
    
chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/29552/c (Let's discuss it over there, aye?) :) – cipher May 11 '13 at 15:11
1  
In an interpreted language replacing printf with an other function that does nothing/outputs to a file/buffer would be trivial... – Bakuriu May 11 '13 at 17:39
1  
You could use different output streams, for example use fprintf(stderr,...) for messages you want to be able to discard and fprintf(stdout,...) for others. – William Morris May 11 '13 at 19:34
up vote 9 down vote accepted

An awfully complicated way to do almost what you want is to use the dup2() system call. This requires executing fflush(stdout); dup2(silentfd, stdout); before function() is called, and copying back afterwards: fflush(stdout); dup2(savedstdoutfd, stdout);. So it is not possible to do as just silence(function()), since this construct only allows to execute code after function() has already been executed.

The file descriptors silentfd and savedstdoutfd have to be prepared in advance (untested code):

 int silentfd = open("/dev/null",O_WRONLY);
 int savedstdoutfd = dup(stdout);

This is almost certainly not what you really want, but inasmuch as your question is phrased as “is it possible?”, the answer is “almost”.

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1  
Technically, you could program a C interpreter in C, have the interpreter execute the function, and ignore all printfs within the function. So of course the answer is "yes", Turing-completeness mandates it. – Anubhav C May 11 '13 at 15:00
    
@PascalCuoq Why can it be evaluated to run before it is passed to the silence? – BLUEPIXY May 11 '13 at 15:04
    
@BLUEPIXY Ah, yes, you raise a good point, even dup2() does not quite allow what the OP would like to do, which is to write silence(f()) to silence f. I will incorporate this nuance in my answer. – Pascal Cuoq May 11 '13 at 15:12
2  
silence could be turned into a macro. – Daij-Djan May 11 '13 at 15:52
1  
@BasileStarynkevitch I incorporated this suggestion and tried to expand on how to prepare savedstdoutfd too, but are you sure about the O_RDONLY part of your suggestion? I would have expected O_WRONLY to emulate stdout more closely. – Pascal Cuoq May 11 '13 at 22:29

use macro function and null device.

E.g. for windows

#include <stdio.h>

#define silence(x) (_stream = freopen("NUL:", "w", stdout), _ret_value = x,_stream = freopen("CON:", "w", stdout),_ret_value)
int _ret_value;
FILE *_stream;

int function(){
  printf("BLAH!");
  return 10;

}
int main(void){
    printf("%d", silence( function()) );
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Macro function is not a function. It's only the appearance. – BLUEPIXY May 11 '13 at 16:24
    
First of all one to many closing parenthesis next to function. Second what could be correct macro version for UNIX, SunOS to be precise. And third for a complete code example. – PovilasID May 12 '13 at 18:25
    
I think the test of environment for *nix because the Windows environment can't be but (other people to also wrote) and can do the same thing. – BLUEPIXY May 12 '13 at 21:38

No its not possible. You could however try to temporarily redirect the stdout to something else. That may come close to what you want.

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You can use this macro instead of printf to be able to prevent printing:

int flag=0;
#define PRINT(...) if(flag){printf(...)}

then use PRINT macro by considering the variable flag. If flag==1, the function will print and if flag==0, the function will not print.

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With GCC extensions, you might consider having macros like

bool silent;
#define silence(X) ({int _x; quiet(); _x = (X); verbose(); _x; })
#define printf(Fmt,...) \
  do{if (!silent) printf(Fmt,##__VA_ARGS__);}while(0)

that silence macro would work only if its argument X is a int expression (or use typeof) I also assume that the result of printf is never used. Recall that "recursive" macros are specially pre-processed, the inside occurrence of printf (in that printf macro) is left verbatim without macro-expansion.

Notice that silence cannot be a function (otherwise, its argument would have been evaluated before calling it). And you need GCC statement expressions extension to "remember" the result of the argument in some variable _x (you could generate that name using __COUNTER__ and preprocessor concatenation), to give it back as the value of silence macro invocation.

Then you need to define your functions quiet() and verbose(), perhaps something like

void quiet() 
{
   silent = true;
}

void verbose()
{
   silent = false,
}

if you don't want to define printf as your macro, you could use freopen(3) on stdout (perhaps with "/dev/null" etc...) or do dup2(2) tricks (like suggested by Pascal Cuoq).

If your code base is huge, and you want something more serious and are willing to spend days or weeks of work, consider customizing your GCC compiler with a plugin or a MELT extension (or ask someone to do it). Notice that printf is known to GCC.

In reality, you should define your own macro like

#define myprintf(Fmt, ...) do{if (!silent) \
    printf(Fmt,__VA_ARGS__);}while(0)

and just use myprintf instead of printf everywhere, this is a portable trick. Of course, I assume you are not passing printf as a function pointer.

For debugging, I actually recommend

#define dbgprintf(Fmt,...) do{if (wantdebug) \
  printf("%s:%d:" Fmt "\n", __FILE__, __LINE__, \
          ##__VA_ARGS__);}while(0)

and then I use dbgprintf("i=%d",i) or simply dbgprintf("foo here") in my code.

I'm using ##__VA_ARGS__ which is a GCC extension to accept no variable arguments to a variadic macro. If you want strict C99, you will just say __VA_ARGS__ and every dbgprintf would need one argument after the format.

You could also re-implement your own printf function, but I don't advise doing that.

(Notice that things could be more complex, you can print using fputs not printf ....)

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1  
printf("BLAH!"); is expanded as printf("BLAH!",); . I can not compile with an error. – BLUEPIXY May 11 '13 at 23:31
    
Sorry, you need ##__VA_ARGS__ .. corrected... – Basile Starynkevitch May 12 '13 at 6:53
    
It's perfect works. thanks. – BLUEPIXY May 12 '13 at 9:01

If you're designing the function do the following:

int function(void (*printer)(char *)){
    if (!printer)
        printer = printf;

    printer("BLAH!");
    return 10;
}

void silence(char *s){
    return;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv){
    printf("%d\n", function(silence));
    return 0;
}

That should do what you're looking for. Unfortunately, I didn't test it and my C is probably a little bit rusty.

Of course if function isn't something you have control over, the answers already posted are all correct solutions.


Actually, if you're designing the function yourself, just do:

int function(int print){
    if (print)
       printf("BLAH!");

    return 10;
}


function(0);  /* Won't print anything */
function(!0);  /* Will print "BLAH!" */

because 0 is false and any non-zero (or !0) value is true. My above suggestion is error prone since you'll have to be able to mimic the printf signature for silence or for any other function you wish to use.

share|improve this answer
    
I am working on collaboration project so there are functions that I can not edit but for some I probably apply this work around. – PovilasID May 12 '13 at 18:35
    
If you're using function as part of a library, that library should never be printing anything. Everything that needs to be printed should be performed by the user. Feel free to yell at the library author. Also, certain functionality generally should be decoupled to provide reusability. Good luck with the project though. – sigmavirus24 May 12 '13 at 18:40

Unfortunately if you have the function explicitly printing and call it like this then it will always print. if you want to silence the function completely you could simply comment out that line.You could even use a control statement so that it only prints IF and when a condition is met otherwise it stays blank and only returns the number.

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