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I am getting errors with the following code and don't know where I am going wrong.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstring>
#include "Translator.h"

using namespace std;

int main (void)

{

char Dictionary::translate (char out_s[], const char s[])
{
int i;

for (i=0;i < numEntries; i++)
{
if (strcmp(englishWord[i], s)==0)
break;
}

if (i<numEntries)
strcpy(out_s,elvishWord[i]);
}

char Translator::toElvish(char elvish_line[],const char english_line[])

{
int j=0;

char temp_eng_words[2000][50];
//char temp_elv_words[2000][50]; NOT SURE IF I NEED THIS

std::string str = english_line;
std::istringstream stm(str);
string word;
while( stm >> word) // read white-space delimited tokens one by one
{
int k=0;
strcpy (temp_eng_words[k],word.c_str());

k++;

}

for (int i=0; i<2000;i++) // ERROR: out_s was not declared in this scope
{
Dictionary::translate (out_s,temp_eng_words[i]); // ERROR RELATES TO THIS LINE
}

}



Translator::Translator(const char dictFileName[]) : dict(dictFileName)
{
char englishWord[2000][50];
char temp_eng_word[50];
char temp_elv_word[50];
char elvishWord[2000][50];
int num_entries;

fstream str;

str.open(dictFileName, ios::in);
int i;

while (!str.fail())
{
for (i=0; i< 2000; i++)
{
str>> temp_eng_word;
str>> temp_elv_word;
strcpy(englishWord[i],temp_eng_word);
strcpy(elvishWord[i],temp_elv_word);
}

num_entries = i;

}

str.close();

}
}}

The first error I get is around

char Dictionary::translate (char out_s[], const char s[])
 {
   int i;

where it says "A function definition is not allowed before a '{' token. The second error I get is at the that there is an expected '}' at the end of input, but no matter how many i put in or leave out it still gives the same error message.

And ideas??

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1  
You can not define a function inside another function. Move the member function declarations outside main. –  Named May 11 '13 at 15:07
    
main is a function; you have all your other functions inside main. Functions don't "nest" in C++. –  Eric Lippert May 11 '13 at 15:07
    
It'll mess you guys up when the new inline functions are introduced in c++11. :) –  Zyrius May 11 '13 at 15:15
1  
Suggestions: 1. Use std::string. 2. Use std::map, which is an associative array, a.k.a., dictionary. This will ease your burden on implementation so you can concentrate on design. –  Thomas Matthews May 11 '13 at 16:17
1  
@Derija93 Inline functions exist for ages. Nested functions weren't introduced by C++11 –  icepack May 11 '13 at 16:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're defining all the functions inside main(). Move them all before main().

share|improve this answer
    
The functions have already been declared in a class inside translator.h What i am actually trying to do is call the functions inside the main function, but am unsure how to proceed. –  Daniel o Keeffe May 11 '13 at 16:58
    
@DanieloKeeffe Declared (name and parameters only) or defined (along with body)? The normal approach would be: declare them in a header file; define them in a .cpp file; call them in main(). –  Angew May 11 '13 at 17:12
    
Cheers that clears up a lot –  Daniel o Keeffe May 11 '13 at 17:33
    
At present I have a translator.cpp, a main.cpp and a translator.h file. Can the translator.cpp function without an int main, just define the functions which are called with main() in main.cpp? –  Daniel o Keeffe May 11 '13 at 17:36
    
@DanieloKeeffe 1) That's precisely how you'd do it. Declare functions in translator.h, which is included in both .cpp files. Define them in translator.cpp and call them in main.cpp - including the header there will make their declarations visible. 2) There must be exactly one int main() function in a C++ program, regardless of the number of .cpp files (= "translation units") comprising it. –  Angew May 11 '13 at 17:43

You shouldn't define a function right within another function. Function definitions come after each other.

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It's not allowed to declare inner functions in C++. Move your functions to a distinct scope, without nesting into main.

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