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I just wanted to clarify something, imagine we have the function signature:

1) int* X(){}

2) int Y(){}

3) int& Z(){}

I am trying to work out the exhaustive possibilities of types of values I can return for the above. The below show possible implementations for the above function bodies:

1)

int* X(){
    int* b = new int(6);
    return b;
}

2)

int Y(){
    int b = 6;
    return b;
}

or

int Y(){
    int* b = new int(6);
    return *b;
}

EDIT: 2) not good because of memory leak if b isn't deleted.

3)

int& Z(){
    int b = 6;
    return b;
}

EDIT: 3) not good because b will go out of scope once function returns.

Is there anything I have missed out which could be returned from any of the above 3 function signatures? Getting a bit more adventurous, what about:

int* X(){
    int b = 6;
    return reinterpret_cast<b>;
}

and

int X(){
    int* b = new int(6);
    return reinterpret_cast<b>;
}

? (My understanding of reinterpret_cast may be wrong...)

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Can't wait to hear the justifications for the down-voting (if there are any).... –  user997112 May 11 '13 at 15:41
    
The second part of 2 should be return ( *b ); 3 may be incorrect. You are returning reference to something that may not exist (it is volatile). –  unxnut May 11 '13 at 15:42
1  
there are infinite possibilities of types of values you can return, you can return int *************** until the compiler give up. –  yngum May 11 '13 at 15:43
2  
People will downvote if they do not like something. Wish stackexchange introduces a policy to justify downvotes. –  unxnut May 11 '13 at 15:44
2  
No, your reinterpret_cast won't even compile. Reference here –  Blastfurnace May 11 '13 at 15:55
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
int Y(){
    int* b = new int(6);
    return b*;
}

This has a syntax error. To dereference b, you would do *b. Nonetheless, this is a very bad implementation because it leaks memory. The dynamically allocated int will never be destroyed.

int& Z(){
    int b = 6;
    return b;
}

This is also bad because you are returning a reference to a local variable. The local variable b will be destroyed when the function returns and you'll be left with a reference to a non-existent object.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not saying what is good- just what is legal. –  user997112 May 11 '13 at 15:42
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