Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

I've written the following snippet of code:

var f = function() { document.write("a"); };

function foo() {
    f();

    var f = function() { document.write("b"); };
}

foo();

I expected the function that prints a to be called, but it instead gives a runtime error about calling an undefined value. Why does this happen?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Bergi, Paul S., squint, Antony, Juhana May 11 '13 at 17:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This phenomenon is certainly detailed in every beginner JavaScript book, not to mention countless beginner tutorials and StackOverflow questions. Hard to understand why people still get stuck on this. – squint May 11 '13 at 17:35
up vote 14 down vote accepted

It's about variables hoisting http://www.adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html , http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/javascript-ajax/quick-tip-javascript-hoisting-explained/

You code is eqvivalent to the next one;

var f = function() { document.write("a"); };
function foo() {
    //all var statements are analyzed when we enter the function
    var f;
    //at this step of execution f is undefined;
    f();
    f = function() { document.write("b"); };
}
foo();
share|improve this answer

Since (just like in java) you don't have to worry about the order you define things in in a file a certain situation occurs. When you redefine the variable f it blanks out the other version of f but it is not defined until after so when f is called you get an error.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.