Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to Python. Just putting that out there.

What I want to do is to add the output of a function to a string literal that another function outputs.

This is the case:

**

def prime(n):
    **blahh blah blah....**
    if z == True:
        return " and prime"
    else:
        return ""
def happyPrime(n):
     **more blah blah blah**
            if n == 1:
                print ("Number is happy%s!" % prime)
                break
            if n in visited:
                print ("Number is sad%s!" % prime)
            visited.add(n)

[Ignore the indentations in the code snippet, StackOverflow made them come out wrong.] The intended result is, of course, that where the modulo is it adds what the other function returned. I think I may be approaching it the wrong way, though.

share|improve this question
1  
You should use prime(n) instead of just prime; print ("Number is happy%s!" % prime(n)). –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 11 '13 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here:

def happyPrime(n):
     **more blah blah blah**
            if n == 1:
                print ("Number is happy%s!"  %  prime(n))
                break
            if n in visited:
                print ("Number is happy%s!"  %  prime(n))
            visited.add(n)

Your prime(n) function returns a string. So, %s will be replaced with the returned string.

Alternatively, you can just concatenate the returned string. For example :

>>> def foo(n):
        if n == True:
            return "yay"
        else:
            return "boo"

>>> def happyPrime(n):
        print "bar " + foo(n)

>>> happyPrime(True)
bar yay

>>> happyPrime(False)
bar boo
share|improve this answer
1  
thanks! It works! –  Aristides May 11 '13 at 17:59
1  
It's worth noting the Python docs recommend the newer str.format() over the old % string formatting. –  Lattyware May 11 '13 at 18:02
    
@Lattyware Thank you for pointing that out. I should have read the Python docs more carefully. –  Thanakron Tandavas May 11 '13 at 18:05
1  
@ThanakronTandavas It's not a huge problem - % style formatting isn't even deprecated yet (although that might happen at some point), but it's probably a good idea to get into the habit of using the new style formatting. It's more powerful and easier to read. –  Lattyware May 11 '13 at 18:10
1  
@Lattyware Couldn't agree with you more. I will stick to str.format() then. –  Thanakron Tandavas May 11 '13 at 18:14

Not sure quite what you mean, if you want %s to return the result of prime(n) you have to give prime an argument because it expects one. from the looks of it, either True or False.

print ("number is happy%s!" % prime(True))

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.