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I have a large table (between 74 and 88million rows) which is the middle table (Table B) of a many to many relationship. I have a view that builds a unified picture of the data contained in the these tables. The view has a clustered index defined against it.

Table A on the left hand side of my large table is the core table in my database. Table C is the table that contains the normalised data items. When I insert a new record into table C the task takes a long time to complete (5mins on a very very good server). This is because SQL server rebuilds part of the clustered index on the view (I can see a clustered index insert in the actual execution plan). This is despite the new row in Table C not being referenced in Table B. Inserting rows into Table A and Table B takes milliseconds as I would expect. The database is not partitioned.

This is an annoymised version of the tables creation script. I've left in the columns that aren't used so you can see the full structure of the tables.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TableA] (
    [TableAId] [INT] IDENTITY(1,1)  NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY  CLUSTERED ,
    [TableAIdGUID] [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL,
    [ImportantId] [INT] NOT NULL ,
    [DateCreated] [datetime] NOT NULL ,
    [OtherId2] [int] NOT NULL ,
    [TableATypeId] [int] NOT NULL ,
    [Active] [bit] NOT NULL ,
    [AuditUser] [NVARCHAR] (20) NULL , 
    [AuditTime] [datetime] NULL 
)
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TableB] (
    [TableBId] [INT]  IDENTITY(1,1)  NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY  CLUSTERED ,
    [TableBGUID]  [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL,
    [TableAId] [INT] NOT NULL ,
    [TableCId] [INT] NOT NULL ,
    [Tag] [NVARCHAR] (50) NULL , 
    [Order] [tinyint] NOT NULL ,
    [DateCreated] [datetime] NOT NULL ,
    [Date1] [datetime] NULL ,
    [Date2] [datetime] NULL ,
    [LastUpdated] [datetime] NOT NULL ,
    [Active] [bit] NOT NULL ,
    [AuditUser] [NVARCHAR] (20) NULL , 
    [AuditTime] [datetime] NULL
)
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TableC] (
    [TableCId] [INT] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY  CLUSTERED ,
    [TableCIdGUID]  [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL,
    [TableCTypeId] [int] NOT NULL ,
    [TableCValue] [NVARCHAR] (255) NOT NULL , 
    [Frequency] [float] NOT NULL  DEFAULT 1,
    [TableCValue2] [NVARCHAR] (255) NULL ,
    [AuditUser] [NVARCHAR] (20) NULL ,
    [AuditTime] [datetime] NULL 
)
GO

CREATE VIEW [dbo].[vwTables]
WITH SCHEMABINDING ,ENCRYPTION
AS

SELECT  dbo.[TableB].TableBId, 
    	dbo.[TableB].TableAId, 
    	dbo.TableA.ImportantId,
    	dbo.TableC.TableCValue,
    	dbo.TableC.TableCValue2, 
    	dbo.TableC.TableCTypeId,
    	dbo.TableA.TableATypeId
FROM    dbo.[TableB] INNER JOIN
        dbo.TableC ON dbo.[TableB].TableCId = dbo.TableC.TableCId INNER JOIN
        dbo.TableA ON dbo.[TableB].TableAId = dbo.TableA.TableAId
WHERE     (dbo.[TableB].Active =  CAST(1 AS BIT)) AND (dbo.TableC.TableCValue<>'') and (dbo.TableC.TableCValue is not null)
GO

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX [IX_vwTables] ON [dbo].[vwTables] 
(
    [TableCValue] ASC,
    [TableCTypeId] ASC,
    [TableBId] ASC,
    [ImportantId] ASC
)
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[TableB] ADD 
    CONSTRAINT [FK_TableB_TableC] FOREIGN KEY 
    (
    	[TableCId]
    ) REFERENCES [dbo].[TableC] (
    	[TableCId]
    ),
    CONSTRAINT [FK_TableB_TableA] FOREIGN KEY 
    (
    	[TableAId]
    ) REFERENCES [dbo].[TableA] (
    	[TableAId]
    )
GO


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_TableA_Nonclustered] ON [dbo].[TableA] 
(
    [ImportantId] ASC,
    [TableAId] ASC,
    [TableATypeId] ASC,
    [Active] ASC
)
GO

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_TableA_OtherId2] ON [dbo].[TableA] 
(
    [AuditTime] ASC,
    [OtherId2] ASC
)
GO


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_TableB_NonClustered] ON [dbo].[TableB] 
(
    [TableAId] ASC,
    [TableBId] ASC,
    [Active] ASC
)
GO

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_EntityAttributes_NonClustered_2] ON [dbo].[TableB] 
(
    [TableBId] ASC,
    [TableAId] ASC,
    [TableCId] ASC,
    [Tag] ASC,
    [Active] ASC
) 
GO

A sample query ran against this is as follows.

SELECT Query.ImportantId
FROM(

    	SELECT 	b.ImportantId
    	FROM [vwTables] a WITH (NOLOCK)
    	INNER JOIN [vwTables] b WITH (NOLOCK, NOEXPAND) ON a.TableCValue = b.TableCValue
    	WHERE a.ImportantId = @ImportantId AND
    	a.TableATypeId=3 AND b.TableATypeId=3			

) As Query
GROUP BY Query.ImportantId

Does anyone know how I can get the inserts into table C to happen (almost) instantaneously like the inserts into TableA and TableB?

Thanks in advanced.

share|improve this question
    
Do post some code, in particular the CREATE of the View and its index. But, yes... If the view, hence index, has fields from all three tables, that would imply the index to changed which could be slow depending on the situation. (5 mins do seem odd, but then again, a clustered ix on the view is a bit odd too ;-) ) –  mjv Oct 30 '09 at 14:24
1  
Can you explain how the new row in Table C is not being referenced in Table B? Maybe you'll need to show your table structures, the code for your view, and the INSERT statement that causes the problem. –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 30 '09 at 14:31
    
Have you tried adding TableC.TableCId to vwTables and as the first column in you clustered index IX_vwTables? –  Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 30 '09 at 14:59
    
There is a foreign key between the tables (I've updated the create script above with these) so TableC needs to have the value first to get its identity id before TableB can get a the new value –  Keith K Oct 30 '09 at 14:59
    
What indexes are currently in place on the physical tables? –  John Sansom Oct 30 '09 at 15:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, you have a clustered index on a view. When SQL Server sees that the tables beneath the view change, it has to reindex the view. This is only appropriate when the tables change rarely (think Business Intelligence databases.)

Consider removing the index from the view, and support the view with indexes on the underlying tables.

For example, see this quote from MSDN:

Q. I update my data warehouse once a week. Indexed views speed up my queries a lot during the week, but slow down the weekly update? What should I do?

A. Consider dropping the indexed views before the weekly update, and creating them again afterwards.

EDIT: Your example query appears to search for rows in A that share a TableCValue. I'd think it would benefit from these indexes:

  • Table A: (TableATypeId,TableAId)
  • Table B: (TableAId,TableCId)
  • Table B: (TableCId,TableAId)
  • Table C: (TableCValue,TableCId)

With these indexes you'd hope the query is fast enough that it doesn't require an indexed view.

P.S. Be sure to compare my suggestion with the index suggestions from SQL Server Profiler in case I missed something.

share|improve this answer
    
The underlying tabled do have indexes but we need to index the view to get the level of performance we need. –  Keith K Oct 30 '09 at 14:47
    
Before we do any bulk update the indexes on the views are disabled but the problem comes from our trickle update system. The updates need to take place while the database is operational. –  Keith K Oct 30 '09 at 15:01
    
+1: This is the way to go.... The root cause of the problem is the underlying tables of the view and this is where performance tuning needs to take place. Tackle the problem at the source. –  John Sansom Oct 30 '09 at 15:07
    
Trickle updates don't work well with indexed views; I don't know of a fix for that. Indexes on the tables should be worth a try. We might be able to help if you give some examples of queries that are run against the view. –  Andomar Oct 30 '09 at 15:09
    
The main query that is run against the view that causes the need for the index is as follows, I can't give you much more I'm afraid. SELECT Query.ImportantId FROM( SELECT b.ImportantId FROM [vwTables] a WITH (NOLOCK) INNER JOIN [vwTables] b WITH (NOLOCK, NOEXPAND) ON a.TableCValue = b.TableCValue WHERE a.ImportantId = @ImportantId AND a.TableATypeId=3 AND b.TableATypeId=3 ) As Query GROUP BY Query.ImportantId –  Keith K Oct 30 '09 at 15:36

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