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My goal is to create a class which adds every instance created from it to a static member container, so that all instances can easily be accessed.

The context is a game where objects are created in an Game.init() function, then added to a container. The Game.update() and Game.Draw() functions then iterate through the container to access and manipulate the objects.

Instead of manually adding or removing the objects to/from the container, I would like the constructor and deconstructor to handle these tasks.

The pointers become invalid when objects (Boxes in this code) are copied or assigned which is problem. Using an object container instead of a pointer-to-object container resulted in excessive copies being made and I wasn't able to get this working with references. I'm looking for some tips on how to improve this code to avoid these problems (using a pointer-to-object container isn't required, in fact I would prefer to avoid using pointers but didn't manage to get this working without them):

#include <list>
#include <iostream>

class Box
{
    private:
        std::list <Box*>::iterator iter;
    public:
        static std::list <Box*> List;
        Box() {
            List.push_front(this);
            iter = List.begin();
            std::cout << "Constructing box." << std::endl;
        }
        ~Box() {
            std::cout << "Trashing box." << std::endl;
            List.erase(iter);
        }
        void lookInside() {
            std::cout << "It's empty." << std::endl;
        };
};

std::list <Box*> Box::List;

int main()
{
    Box Box_1;
    Box Box_2;
    Box Box_3;

    Box_1 = Box_2; // causes problems!

    for (auto iter : Box::List) {
        iter->lookInside();
    }

    std::cout << "The list contains " << Box::List.size() << " boxes." << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
That shouldn't cause problems. You still have 3 boxes. You're just assigning Box_2 to Box_1. –  Joseph Mansfield May 11 '13 at 20:30
    
The code does work, but crashes befor exiting. –  A.B. May 11 '13 at 20:32
    
Ah I see, the problem is with the iter member. –  Joseph Mansfield May 11 '13 at 20:33
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1 Answer

You're violating the rule of three/five.

You'll undoubtedly need to overload assignment and copy construction (at the very least) to make your class work as desired. The default copy constructor will just copy the iterator so you'll end up with the second object containing a copy of the original iterator, pointing to the original object, so when either copy gets destroyed, that item gets removed from your collection.

Obviously, what you want is to add a new object to your collection, and have that object hold the iterator to the new object in the collection when copy construction is done.

Likewise, the default assignment operator will copy the iterator from the source to the target. You probably just want to leave the iterator unchanged (i.e., still referring to the same object in the collection, since assignment results in the same object holding a different value).

#include <list>
#include <iostream>

class Box
{
    private:
        std::list <Box*>::iterator iter;
    public:
        static std::list <Box*> List;
        Box() {
            List.push_front(this);
            iter = List.begin();
            std::cout << "Constructing box." << std::endl;
        }
        ~Box() {
            std::cout << "Trashing box." << std::endl;
            List.erase(iter);
        }
        void lookInside() {
            std::cout << "It's empty." << std::endl;
        };

        // JVC: added next two overloads:
        Box &operator=(Box const &src) { 
            // don't assign anything.
            return *this;
        }
        Box(Box const &other) { 
            List.push_front(this);
            iter = List.begin();
            std::cout << "Copy constructing box.\n";
        }
};

std::list <Box*> Box::List;

int main()
{
    Box Box_1;
    Box Box_2;
    Box Box_3;

    Box_1 = Box_2; // No longer causes problem!

    for (auto iter : Box::List) {
        iter->lookInside();
    }

    std::cout << "The list contains " << Box::List.size() << " boxes." << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

As an aside: this whole design is probably a mistake. The code above covers for the bugs at a relatively microscopic level, but does nothing to correct the basic problem of the design.

share|improve this answer
    
Any suggestions for an alternative approach? –  A.B. May 11 '13 at 20:59
    
A game containing a collection of [pointers to] objects used in the game would be fine. It's a game containing a collection of games that doesn't make sense (IMO). –  Jerry Coffin May 11 '13 at 21:29
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