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I have these structures:

typedef struct memory_slice {
    size_t startAdd; //Start of slice
    size_t dim; //Dim in bytes
    void *slice; //Chunk of memory
    struct memory_sclice *next; //Next element in list
} ms;

typedef struct heap_s {
    struct memory_slice *empty; //List of ptr to free memory
    struct memory_slice *used;
    heap_policy_t pol;
} heap_t;

I make two functions that work as constructor and destructor:

heap_t *heapCreate (size_t heapSize) {
    heap_t *p = malloc(sizeof(heap_t));

    if (heapSize != 0) {
        p->empty = malloc(sizeof(ms)); //Only one chunk
        p->empty->slice = malloc (sizeof(heapSize));
        p->empty->dim = heapSize;
    } else {
        p->empty = malloc(sizeof(ms));
        size_t ap = 1024;
        p->empty->slice = malloc (sizeof(ap));
        p->empty->dim = ap;
    }

    p->empty->startAdd = 0;
    p->empty->next = NULL;
    p->used = NULL;
    p->pol = first_fit;

    return p;
}

//Destructor of struct
void heapDestroy (heap_t *h) {
    //Free all slices
    struct memory_sclice *app;

    while (h->empty != NULL) {
        free(h->empty->slice);
        app = h->empty;
        h->empty = h->empty->next;
        free(app);
    }

    while (h->used != NULL) {
        free(h->used->slice);
        app = h->used;
        h->used = h->used->next;
        //free(app->slice);
        free(app);
    }

    free(h); //Delete main structure
}

This code works but I don't understand way I can't free memory like this "free(app->slice)" :

while (h->empty != NULL) {
        app = h->empty;
        free(app->slice);
        h->empty = h->empty->next;
        free(app);
    }

Can someone tell me where is the problem using "free(app->slice)" ??

share|improve this question
    
What precisely is the problem? "I don't understand way I can't free memory like this free(app->slice)" - neither do I. –  user529758 May 11 '13 at 21:47
    
Compile error or runtime error? –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 11 '13 at 21:47
    
At what point are you trying to call free(app->slice)? –  FDinoff May 11 '13 at 21:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe it's because you have a typo here:

struct memory_sclice *app;

It should be memory_slice.

Currently, app is not of type memory_slice and thus slice is not a member.

Basically, you have a pointer to a struct with no definition. (Unless for some very odd reason you have a struct in there called memory_sclice :V. I'd be surprised.)

Was this error really the only one that popped up?

share|improve this answer
    
This would wreak havoc with the compilation if compiled with much in the way of warnings. I'm not sure it would have much effect at runtime, though. –  Jonathan Leffler May 12 '13 at 1:50
    
Maybe the best solution is to call everything "ms" to avoid error so : "typedef struct ms { size_t startAdd; size_t dim; void *slice; struct memory_sclice *next; } ms;" –  user72708 May 12 '13 at 9:43

The code supplied has a couple of references to struct memory_cslice; those need to be changed to struct memory_slice. The code doesn't compile unless you add something like:

typedef enum { first_fit, best_fit, worst_fit } heap_policy_t;

Have you got and used valgrind available to you?

There are two problematic calls to malloc() (not adjacent in the actual code):

p->empty->slice = malloc(sizeof(heapSize));
...
p->empty->slice = malloc(sizeof(ap));

In each case, the argument to sizeof() is of type size_t, so in fact the two blocks are allocating the same amount of space, and it is likely either 4 bytes or 8 bytes. Very often it is correct to use sizeof() with malloc(); this is one of the cases where it is not correct. You'd simplify your code if you wrote:

heap_t *heapCreate(size_t heapSize)
{
    heap_t *p = malloc(sizeof(heap_t));

    if (heapSize == 0)
        heapSize = 1024;
    p->empty = malloc(sizeof(ms));
    p->empty->slice = malloc(heapSize);
    p->empty->dim = heapSize;
    p->empty->startAdd = 0;
    p->empty->next = NULL;
    p->used = NULL;
    p->pol = first_fit;
    return p;
}

Of course, you should handle the cases where malloc() fails, so that should be improved to:

heap_t *heapCreate(size_t heapSize)
{
    heap_t *p = malloc(sizeof(heap_t));
    if (p != 0)
    {
        if (heapSize == 0)
            heapSize = 1024;
        if ((p->empty = malloc(sizeof(ms))) == 0)
        {
            free(p);
            return 0;
        }
        if ((p->empty->slice = malloc(heapSize)) == 0)
        {
            free(p->empty);
            free(p);
            return 0;
        }
        p->empty->dim = heapSize;
        p->empty->startAdd = 0;
        p->empty->next = NULL;
        p->used = NULL;
        p->pol = first_fit;
    }
    return p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for corrections, your code is cleaner that mine! I forgot to post that enum : "typedef enum { first_fit, best_fit, worst_fit } heap_policy_t;" –  user72708 May 12 '13 at 9:37
    
(+1) For the good answer. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 12 '13 at 11:20

You should use unix functions brk and sbrk if you want to build your own toy memory manager :)

It would definitely be alot easier to answer if you gave us the specific context of where you called free(app->slice) in your code, inorder for it to break. This is because you should be able free memory by doing a free(app->slice).

share|improve this answer
    
While it's possible to use brk() and sbrk(), I'm not sure it is recommended. Until the basic problems are sorted out, it is sensible and far easier to use malloc() et al in lieu of brk() or sbrk(). –  Jonathan Leffler May 12 '13 at 1:48
    
Thank you I didn't know these functions! –  user72708 May 12 '13 at 9:47

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