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I'm working with a Pandas representation of a fairly complex dataset coming in from a survey. So far, it seems like single-dimensional series of variables with multi-indexes are the best fit for storing with and working with this data.

Each variable name is composed of a "path" to uniquely identify that particular response. These paths are of varying length. I'm trying to figure out if I'm misunderstanding how hierarchical indices are supposed to work, or perhaps if I'm running into a bug. It appears as if Pandas "pads" the shorter indices out to the maximum length when joining them to a dataset, and in the process destroys the value.

For instance, this test fails:

def test_dataframe_construction1(self):
    case1 = pd.Series(True, pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples([
        ('a1', 'b1', 'c1'),
        ('a2', 'b2', 'c2', 'd1', 'e1'),
        ]))
    case2 = pd.Series(True, pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples([
        ('a3', 'b3', 'c3'),
        ('a4', 'b4', 'c4', 'd2', 'e2'),
        ]))
    df = pd.DataFrame({
        'case1': case1,
        'case2': case2
    })
    logger.debug(df)
    self.assertEquals(df['case1'].loc['a1'].any(), True)

And prints this:

a1 b1 c1 nan nan   NaN   NaN
a2 b2 c2 d1  e1   True   NaN
a3 b3 c3 nan nan   NaN   NaN
a4 b4 c4 d2  e2    NaN  True

Interestingly, padding out the "shorter" indices with empty string instead of NaN results in the behavior I would expect:

def test_dataframe_construction2(self):
    case1 = pd.Series(True, pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples([
        ('a1', 'b1', 'c1', '', ''),
        ('a2', 'b2', 'c2', 'd1', 'e1'),
    ]))
    case2 = pd.Series(True, pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples([
        ('a3', 'b3', 'c3', '', ''),
        ('a4', 'b4', 'c4', 'd2', 'e2'),
    ]))
    df = pd.DataFrame({
        'case1': case1,
        'case2': case2
    })
    logger.debug(df)
    self.assertEquals(df['case1'].loc['a1'].any(), True)

And prints this:

                case1 case2
a1 b1 c1        True   NaN
a2 b2 c2 d1 e1  True   NaN
a3 b3 c3         NaN  True
a4 b4 c4 d2 e2   NaN  True

What am I missing here? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
A MultiIndex can't have indices of different lengths. Each index item has to have the same length. If you want to pad them with something else besides NaN you'll have to do that yourself. –  BrenBarn May 11 '13 at 22:24
    
The issue is that padding them with NaN's also destroys the value. Padding them with NaN by hand also has the same result. –  easel May 11 '13 at 23:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Avoid using NaN in an index. Besides that you need a different schema to represent the relation between path/case/data. The fact that you need a variable number of MultiIndex levels is a strong hint and also the case columns look only to use a few paths. I would split the nodes, paths and case data in separate DataFrames. In the example below i show how to represent the first path for case1.

import pandas as pd
from itertools import product

node_names = ['%s%d' % t for t in product('abcd', range(1, 5))]
nodes = pd.DataFrame({'node': node_names})
nodes.index.name = 'id'

path_nodes = pd.DataFrame({'path_id': [0, 0, 0],
                           'node_id': [0, 4, 8],
                           'position':[0, 1, 2]})

data = pd.DataFrame({'path_id': [0],
                     'case': [1],
                     'data': [True]})
In [113]: nodes
Out[113]: 
   node
id     
0    a1
1    a2
2    a3
3    a4
4    b1
5    b2
6    b3
7    b4
8    c1
...

In [114]: path_nodes
Out[114]: 
   node_id  path_id  position
0        0        0         0
1        4        0         1
2        8        0         2

In [115]: data
Out[115]: 
   case  data  path_id
0     1  True        0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is basically the direction I've started to move, although I'm still figuring out the best way to handle the indices so the dataframes can be joined back together for analysis when needed. –  easel May 19 '13 at 14:55
    
Did you check pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/…? –  Wouter Overmeire May 21 '13 at 18:59

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