Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know this is probably the stupidest questions i've asked to date... but I keep looking for reference points and theres so many random questions that its most difficult to find. I know its most likely an issue with the correct syntax, but for the life of me, and after much trial and error, I know its probably just easier to ask.... (also, lastInsertId() will not be a possible solution because there is other omitted code)... Does it have to be a global variable to return correctly... as far as my understanding.... not explicitly

Question: How can I echo this variable correctly:

Echo Code

$customer = new SoClassy();
$var1 = "test 1";
$var2= "test 2";
$var3= "test 3";
try {
$customer->add_function($var1,$var2,$var3);
$last_insert_id= $customer->$return_this_variable; 

echo "HERE:  ";
echo $last_insert_id;
}
catch (Exception $e) {
print "Error: " . $e->getMessage();
}

Class Code (different *.php)

 function add_function($var1,$var2,$var3)
     {
        $data = array(
            'position_one' => $var1,
            'position_two' => $var2,
            'position_three' => $var3
        );
        try {
            $this->db->insert($this->config->database->tables->table_name, $data);
            $return_this_variable = $this->db->lastInsertId();
       return $return_this_variable;
            }
        catch ...{}
        catch ...{}
    }
share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I've understood your question. What do you need to return? At any case, you can make available to your function whatever you either return from a method/function or something which is already visible from outher scope (IE a global). Former is most always a wiser choice, because it reduces dependencies. –  maraspin May 11 '13 at 23:05
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand the question correctly.. the function is returning the value you want. So you assign the function call to your variable:

$last_insert_id = $customer->add_function($var1,$var2,$var3);

share|improve this answer
    
the returned value must be the lastInsertId of the actual row inputted.... –  hawkhorrow May 11 '13 at 23:05
    
but unfortunately, I cant use that specifically because of omitted code, it runs multiple inserts below that excerpt –  hawkhorrow May 11 '13 at 23:05
1  
.... wait a second... I got you now LMAO! –  hawkhorrow May 11 '13 at 23:06
    
okay well your function makes a query and gets the lastInsertID() and puts it in $return_this_variable and then returns that value.. so assuming your query stuff is right, that is what you are getting in $last_insert_id –  Crayon Violent May 11 '13 at 23:07
1  
so instead of $customer->add_function($var1,$var2,$var3); $last_insert_id= $customer->$return_this_variable; you just do the single line i posted –  Crayon Violent May 11 '13 at 23:11
show 3 more comments

Consider following an alternate approach to the one suggested to you, in the case you need to pass out something else than just one function result.

class SoClassy {

protected $itemId;

public function add_function($var1,$var2,$var3)
     {
        $data = array(
            'position_one' => $var1,
            'position_two' => $var2,
            'position_three' => $var3
        );
        try {
            $this->db->insert($this->config->database->tables->table_name, $data);
            $this->itemId = $this->db->lastInsertId();
            }
        catch ...{}
        catch ...{}
    }

}


public function doSomethingElse() {  ... }

public function doItAll($var1,$var2,$var3) {
    $this->add_function($var1,$var2,$var3)
    $this->doSomethingElse();
    return $this->itemId;
}

}

You might want to resort to something like this if you need to perform a lot of operations in your method, in order to avoid it becoming a monster one.

You can do whatever you want to itemId (or other class variables) in doSomethingElse and all other class methods. Basically you keep all temporary variables you need in one place, without making them global, risking for name clashes.

share|improve this answer
    
its a pretty crazy program and i'm just extending functionality at this point, so point taken, but i'm not gonna fully redesign the wheel... if ya catch my drift. +1 for the suggestion though! –  hawkhorrow May 11 '13 at 23:12
    
glad this can be useful to you. If you're going down heavy on db, I suggest that you take a look at stuff like Doctrine ORM. Takes care of handling much of the relational<->object oriented conversion hassle for you. Good luck! –  maraspin May 11 '13 at 23:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.