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I am probably doing something wrong but I found some interesting behavior when trying to apply some object oriented programming to Javascript. Consider the following

function Bug(element) {
    this.focusedCell = null;
    element.addEventListener('click', this.onClick, true);
};

Bug.prototype.onClick = function(event){
    console.log("this is: ");
    console.log(this);
};

When I call the method from the console, I see the correct instance of "this" but when I click the element in the document I see the document element in lieu of the instance. So... chances are it's probably not a good idea to use event listeners with instance methods, at least the way I'm doing it.

So the question is:

  • Is it possible to have an event listener like this that calls an instance method of a javascript object, while preserving the instance in the call?

  • Is there a better pattern for doing this?

Edit: I haven't tried this in anything but Chrome. But I would imagine that the behavior is the same.

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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, null, Raymond Chen, squint, Jesse May 12 '13 at 14:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The function creates a new scope. –  adeneo May 11 '13 at 23:21
    
Thanks, sorry didn't know it was a duplicate search didn't show up with anything. –  lukecampbell May 11 '13 at 23:21
    
@FelixKling Wow sweet you found an perfect dup.. –  null May 11 '13 at 23:22
1  
There are actually tons of duplicates, but they probably have weird titles. –  Felix Kling May 11 '13 at 23:23
    
I googled it too but nada. I searched for "overriding this" on SO but didn't find it. I didn't know that it was explicitly related to the event listener that was overriding, it. –  lukecampbell May 11 '13 at 23:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's a better pattern, and doesn't require much change. I'll show the code first.

function Bug(element) {
    this.focusedCell = null;
    // --------------------------------v----pass the object, not a function
    element.addEventListener('click', this, true);
};

// Implement the `EventListener` interface
Bug.prototype.handleEvent = function(event) {
    if (event.type === "click")
        this.onClick(event);
}

Bug.prototype.onClick = function(event) {
    console.log(JSON.stringify(this));         // '{"focusedCell":null}'
    console.log(event.currentTarget.nodeName); // "DIV"
};

By adding the handleEvent method, we make Bug implement the EventListener interface. This allows us to pass the new Bug object as the second argument to addEventListener() instead of a function.

Now when the "click" event happens, the .handleEvent() method will be invoked, and the value of this in that method will be the Bug object that was bound.


Since this is a reference to the Bug instance, it obviously won't be a reference to the element anymore. But it's not necessary, since the element is available via event.currentTarget.

Of course, you could add the element directly to your Bug object in the constructor if desired.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/CnZTa/


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1  
@lukecampbell: If you have lots of other event types, consider naming your methods after the events. Then your handleEvent() method can simply do return this[event.type] && this[event.type](event); –  squint May 11 '13 at 23:41
2  
I wish I could upvote that more than once squint. –  lukecampbell May 11 '13 at 23:43
2  
The code here can be used to provide compatibility with older browsers. –  bfavaretto May 11 '13 at 23:44
1  
@squint hehe, I guess there will be much more to learn once Harmony kicks-in ;) –  plalx May 12 '13 at 1:41
1  
I guess someone doesn't like (or more likely understand) this solution? If you're not familiar with this technique, by all means, ask about it. I'd be happy to explain more. –  squint May 12 '13 at 12:44

You can use Function.prototype.bind to create a listener bound to whatever this value you want:

function Bug(element) {
    this.focusedCell = null;
    element.addEventListener('click', this.onClick.bind(this), true);
};

Older (non-ES5) browsers will need a polyfill such as the one from MDN.

share|improve this answer

This is normal behavior in JavaScript. You can preserve your expected this by passing an function the the listener:

function Bug(element) {
    var self = this; // Store a reference to this
    this.focusedCell = null;
    element.addEventListener('click', function() {
        // in here this refers to element
        self.onClick(event);
    }, true);
};

Bug.prototype.onClick = function(event){
    console.log("this is: "); 
    console.log(this); // In here this refers the an instance of Bug.
};
share|improve this answer
    
The code is right, but the explanation is not very clear. "by passing a function to the listener"... this is what the OP does already. The difference is that the function is defined inline in your case, so it creates a closure over the parent function's scope which allows to access the self variable from the handler function. –  plalx May 12 '13 at 1:20

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