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I want to convert the elements of the string array below to symbols, and output them

strings = ["HTML", "CSS", "JavaScript", "Python", "Ruby"]

look at what I'm doing:

strings.each { |x| puts x.to_sym }

No success. What am I doing wrong?

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Possible Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/800122/… –  user1888370 May 12 '13 at 0:00
    
@Abe: That's for keys of a hash. This is for array elements. –  icktoofay May 12 '13 at 0:04
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@icktofay I see, but it would be easy to convert them, right? –  user1888370 May 12 '13 at 0:05
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@Abe That doesn't mean it's a duplicate.... Also, not really. Do you know Ruby? –  Doorknob May 12 '13 at 0:05
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@Abe: Maybe, but you'd have a cleaner answer if you just started out trying to do it with an array. –  icktoofay May 12 '13 at 0:05
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3 Answers

icktoofay already gave the correct answer.

On additional remark: With

strings.map { |x| x.to_sym }

you get a new array, the original array is unchanged.

To use it, you can assign it to another variable:

string2 = strings.map { |x| x.to_sym }

If you want to modify string, you can use map!:

strings.map! { |x| x.to_sym }
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@icktoofay has the correct answer, but just to help you better understand the each method, here is how you can do the same thing using each:

strings = ["HTML", "CSS", "JavaScript", "Python", "Ruby"]
symbols = [] # an empty array to hold our symbols
strings.each do {|s| symbols << s.to_sym }
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Use map rather than each:

>> strings.map { |x| x.to_sym }
=> [:HTML, :CSS, :JavaScript, :Python, :Ruby]

For Ruby 1.8.7 and later or with ActiveSupport included, you can use this syntax:

>> strings.map &:to_sym
=> [:HTML, :CSS, :JavaScript, :Python, :Ruby]

The reason your each method appears to not work is that calling puts with a symbol outputs the string representation of the symbol (that is, without the :). Additionally, you're just looping through and outputting things; you're not actually constructing a new array.

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