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I am trying to match something and for the life of me I cannot figure out WHY it does not work as expected.

String: "/*! preserved */"

Pattern:

Pattern.compile("(/[*][!](?:.+?)[*]/)", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE)  
- FAIL

Pattern:

Pattern.compile("(/[*](?:.+?)[*]/)", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE) 
- PASS

I only want to catch comments that have a ! right after the opening comment string. I even tried reducing the match to just /*!:

Pattern.compile("(/[*][!])", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE) 
- FAIL

Pattern.compile("(/[*!]{2})", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE)
- FAIL

Pattern.compile("(/[*][!])", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE)
- FAIL


Java Version "1.6.0_43"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_43-b01)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.14-b01, mixed mode)

EDIT

This fails, which does not make sense to me since my pattern does not have a start or end with a requirement:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(/[*]!.+?[*]/)", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
Matcher m = p.matcher("this is a test /*! preserved */ this is a test /*! preserved1 */");
System.out.println("Pattern: " + p);
System.out.println("Group: " + m.group(1));
System.out.println("Found: " + m.find());

Even reducing it to just match /*! fails:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(/[*]!)", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
Matcher m = p.matcher("this is a test /*! preserved */ this is a test /*! preserved1 */");
System.out.println("Match: " + m.find());
System.out.println("Pattern: " + p);
System.out.println("Group: " + m.group(1));
share|improve this question
1  
* is a special character, escape it like so \\* –  Doorknob May 12 '13 at 3:03
8  
@Doorknob putting * in [] like he did makes it match a literal *. –  Kevin May 12 '13 at 3:06

3 Answers 3

    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(/[*]!.+?[*]/)", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL
            | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
    System.out.println(p.matcher("/*! preserved */").matches());

output

true
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I had to tweek it a bit, and I am still confused as to why m.find() returns false, but I updated my code to use m.matches() –  Digitalxero May 12 '13 at 4:21
    
As matter of fact, your pattern #1 works fine for me as is for both find and matches. I just wanted to show that it works and also that expression can be simplified a bit. I dont know how come it does not work for you –  Evgeniy Dorofeev May 12 '13 at 4:47
    
It does not match if you add any text before or after the comment –  Digitalxero May 12 '13 at 6:52
    
@Digitalxero, if you use .matches() then the whole input must be matched. To find a matching substring in a larger string use .find(). –  Mike Samuel May 12 '13 at 7:10
    
find does not seem to work either, if you look at my last example in my original post –  Digitalxero May 13 '13 at 17:54

Taken from the javadoc for matcher.find().

public boolean find()

Attempts to find the next subsequence of the input sequence that matches the pattern. This method starts at the beginning of this matcher's region, or, if a previous invocation of the method was successful and the matcher has not since been reset, at the first character not matched by the previous match.

If the match succeeds then more information can be obtained via the start, end, and group methods.

Returns:

true if, and only if, a subsequence of the input sequence matches this matcher's pattern

Find starts searching from the end of the last match. Not from the beginning of the String. This is the reason m.find() returns false.

You can see this behavior with this example.

Pattern p = Pattern.compile(".*(/[*]!.+?[*]/).*", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
Matcher m = p.matcher("this is a test /*! preserved */ this is a test /*! preserved1 */");
//System.out.println("Match: " + m.matches());
//System.out.println("Pattern: " + p);
//System.out.println("Group: " + m.group(1));
System.out.println("Found: " + m.find());

This returns true. However if you the uncomment the other lines, m.find() will return false.

If you called m.reset() before calling m.find() you will be able to tell if the pattern is anywhere in the string. However this resets the state of the matcher which might not be desirable.

Edit:

To find all matches by just using find use the following code. (Notice the missing .*)

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(/[*]!.+?[*]/)", Pattern.MULTILINE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
Matcher m = p.matcher("this is a test /*! preserved */ this is a test /*! preserved1 */");
while(m.find()) {
    System.out.println(m.group());
}

Output

/*! preserved */
/*! preserved1 */

Since Matcher.matches() must match the whole string you need a slightly more complex regex to find all the matches which is probably undesirable.

share|improve this answer
    
The thing is that OP's pattern consume the whole string (note the .* behind), and also the .* in front, so there is no way he can find all matches. Even if you use find(), the problem is not solved. –  nhahtdh May 12 '13 at 4:51
    
@FDinoff Just to make it complete, I think you should also point out that matches() have to match the whole string to return true. Also that one needs to call reset() after calling matches() as well (before calling find()). –  acdcjunior May 12 '13 at 16:01
    
@nhahtdh I edited the post to show how to find all the matches with find() –  FDinoff May 12 '13 at 16:45

One example based on String API itshelf for validating Password.

    String password = "Velu1!";
    String pattern = "^(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[!@#$%^&*+=_-])(?=\\S+$).{6,100}$";
    if (!password.matches(pattern)) {
        System.out.println("Invalid Password!");
    } else {
        System.out.println("Valid Password!");
    }

In this case your pattern is

  String pattern = "(/[*]!.+?[*]/)";
share|improve this answer
    
How does this address the question? –  Mike Samuel May 12 '13 at 4:30
    
@MikeSamuel This is alternative for Java pattern/matcher in String API i newly learned. For those who is troubling with usage of pattern / Matcher; they can simply use String API only. –  Kanagavelu Sugumar May 12 '13 at 4:35

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