Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to http://www.codeguru.com/forum/showthread.php?t=463663 , C#'s getHashCode function in 3.5 is implemented as:

public override unsafe int GetHashCode()
{
    fixed (char* str = ((char*) this))
    {
        char* chPtr = str;
        int num = 0x15051505;
        int num2 = num;
        int* numPtr = (int*) chPtr;
        for (int i = this.Length; i > 0; i -= 4)
        {
            num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
            if (i <= 2)
            {
                break;
            }
            num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1];
            numPtr += 2;
        }
        return (num + (num2 * 0x5d588b65));
    }
}

I am curious if anyone can come up with a function which returns the same results, but is faster. It is OK to increase the overall starting and resource overhead of the main application. Requiring a one-time initialization (per application execution, not per call or per string) is OK.

Note that unlike Microsoft, considerations like, "doing it this way will make everything else slower and has costs that make this method stupid!" can be ignored, so it is possible that even assuming Microsoft's is perfect, it can be beaten by doing something "stupid."

This purely an exercise in my own curiosity and will not be used in real code.

Examples of ideas I've thought of:

  • Using multiple cores (calculating num2 and num independently)
  • Using the gpu
share|improve this question
2  
Multiple cores or GPU may increase speed only with HUGE strings. –  Guillaume Oct 30 '09 at 15:17
    
Have you tried either of your ideas (#1 wouldn't be too hard to code up)? If so, post what you've found... –  Michael Burr Oct 30 '09 at 15:18
    
Any particular reason to need it to return the same thing? The GetHashCode algorithm is implementation-defined for all types according to ECMA-335, and in order to reimplement GetHashCode for string then you're already using a different CLR implementation. –  Sam Harwell Oct 30 '09 at 15:19
3  
What about on startup you store the pre-calculated hash of every known string in a dictionary. The the lookup each time will be very quick ;-) –  Matt Warren Oct 30 '09 at 15:48
2  
I just noticed a problem with my "optimisation". You have to compute a hash to look up the item in the dictionary. So your computing a hash to enable you to find the hash value, genius ;-) –  Matt Warren Nov 25 '09 at 13:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Threads and GPU most certainly will introduce overhead greater than possible performance boost. The approach that could be justified is using SIMD instruction sets, such as SSE. However, it would require testing whether this partcular instruction set is available, which may cost. It will also bring boost on long strings only.

If you want to try it, consider testing Mono support for SIMD before diving into C or assembly. Read here about development possibilities and gotchas.

share|improve this answer

One way to make a function go faster is to take special cases into account. A function with variable size inputs has special cases based on size.

Going parallel only makes sense when the the cost of going parallel is smaller than the gain, and for this kind of computation it is likely that the string would have to be fairly large to overcome the cost of forking a parallel thread. But implementing that isn't hard; basically you need a test for this.Length exceeding an empirically determined threshold, and then forking multiple threads to compute hashes on substrings, with a final step composing the subhashes into a final hash. Implementation left for the reader.

Modern processors also have SIMD instructions, which can process up to 32 (or 64) bytes in a single instruction. This would allow you to process the string in 32 (16 bit character) chunks in one-two SIMD instructions per chunk; and then fold the 64 byte result into a single hashcode at the end. This is likely to be extremely fast for strings of any reasonable size. The implementation of this from C# is harder, because one doesn't expect a virtual machine to provide provide easy (or portable) access to the SIMD instructions that you need. Implementation also left for the reader. EDIT: Another answer suggests that Mono system does provide SIMD instruction access.

Having said that, the particular implementation exhibited is pretty stupid. The key observation is that the loop checks the limit twice on every iteration. One can solve that problem by checking the end condition cases in advance, and executing a loop that does the correct number of iterations. One can do better than that by using Duffs device to jump into an unrolled loop of N iterations. This gets rid of the loop limit checking overhead for N-1 iterations. That modification would be very easy and surely be worth the effort to implement.

EDIT: You can also combine the SIMD idea and the loop unrolling idea to enable processing many chunks of 8/16 characters in a few SIMD instrucions.

For languages that can't jump into loops, one can do the equivalent of Duff's device by simply peeling off the initial cases. A shot at how to recode the original code using the loop peeling approach is the following:

    public override unsafe int GetHashCode()
    {
        fixed (char* str = ((char*) this))
        {
            const int N=3; // a power of two controlling number of loop iterations
            char* chPtr = str;
            int num = 0x15051505;
            int num2 = num;
            int* numPtr = (int*) chPtr;
            count = this.length;
            unrolled_iterations = count >> (N+1); // could be 0 and that's OK
            for (int i = unrolled_iterations; i > 0; i--)
            {
               // repeat 2**N times
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[2];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[3]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[4];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[5]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[6];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[7]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[8];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[9]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[10];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[11]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[12];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[13]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[14];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[15]; }
               numPtr += 16;
            }
            if (count & ((1<<N)-1))
            {
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[2];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[3]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[4];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[5]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[6];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[7]; }
               numPtr += 8;
            }
            if (count & ((1<<(N-1))-1))
            {
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1]; }
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[2];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[3]; }
               numPtr += 4;
            }
            if (count & ((1<<(N-2)-1))
            {
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                 num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1]; }
               numPtr += 2;
            }
            // repeat N times and finally:
            if { count & (1) }
            {
               { num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
               // numPtr += 1;
            }

            return (num + (num2 * 0x5d588b65));
        }
    }

I haven't compiled or tested this code, but the idea is right. It depends on the compiler doing reasonable constant folding and address arithmetic.

I tried to code this to preserve the exact hash value of the original, but IMHO that isn't really a requirement. It would be even simpler and a tiny bit faster if it didn't use the num/num2 stunt, but simply updated num for each character.


Corrected version (by Brian) as a static function:

    public static unsafe int GetHashCodeIra(string x)
    {
        fixed (char* str = x.ToCharArray())
        {
            const int N = 2; // a power of two controlling number of loop iterations
            char* chPtr = str;
            int num = 0x15051505;
            int num2 = num;
            int* numPtr = (int*)chPtr;
            int count = (x.Length+1) / 2;
            int unrolled_iterations = count >> (N+1); // could be 0 and that's OK
            for (int i = unrolled_iterations; i > 0; i--)
            {  // repeat 2**N times
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1];
                }
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[2];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[3];
                }
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[4];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[5];
                }
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[6];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[7];
                }
                numPtr += 8;
            }
            if (0 != (count & ((1 << N) )))
            {
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1];
                }
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[2];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[3];
                }
                numPtr += 4;
            }
            if (0 != (count & ((1 << (N - 1) ))))
            {
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                    num2 = (((num2 << 5) + num2) + (num2 >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[1];
                }
                numPtr += 2;
            }
            // repeat N times and finally:
            if (1 == (count & 1))
            {
                {
                    num = (((num << 5) + num) + (num >> 0x1b)) ^ numPtr[0];
                    // numPtr += 1;
                }
            }

            return (num + (num2 * 0x5d588b65));
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
(after fixing it), I tested this. It made no difference, either in debug or compiled mode. It helped a little on really long strings (more than 20 characters), and hurt a little on really short strings (less than 5 characters). Not much difference, though. –  Brian Oct 30 '09 at 18:56
    
Glad you were able to fix it; I didn't think it was wrong :-} One might try reversing the loop peeling steps: do the unit step first, and check so see if the string is short; then the two step, then check for get out, etc. This would make short strings run faster at virtually no impact for the longer ones. I'd also simplify the code to avoid the num/num2 dichotomy; the computation might run entirely in the registers in that case. –  Ira Baxter Oct 30 '09 at 19:59
    
... so what did you actually measure? The time to run a compuation in which hashing was involved, or the time to do the hashing itself? –  Ira Baxter Oct 30 '09 at 20:00
    
... and I wouldn't consider 20 character strings as "long"; you'd never be able to parallelize this for 20 characters. 1000 characters is long. How does it do on 1000 character strings? –  Ira Baxter Oct 30 '09 at 20:08
    
@Ira: Just the hashing itself. –  Brian Oct 30 '09 at 20:27

You could parallelize this however the problem you will run into is that threads, CUDA, etc have overheads associated with them. Even if you use a thread pool, if your strings are not very large, let's say a typical string is 128-256 characters (probably less than this) you will probably still end up making each call to this function taking longer than it did originally.

Now, if you were dealing with very large strings, then yes it would improve your time. The simple algorithm is "embarrassingly parallel."

share|improve this answer

I think all of your suggested approaches are very inefficient compared to the current implementation.

Using GPU: The string data needs to be transferred to the GPU and the result back, which takes a lot of time. GPU's are very fast, but only when comparing floating point calculations, which aren't used here. All operations are on Integers, for which x86 CPU power is decent.

Using Another CPU Core: This would involve creating a separate thread, locking down memory and synchronizing the thread requesting the Hash Code. The incurred overhead simply outweighs the benefits of parallel processing.

If you would want to calculate Hash values of thousands of strings in one go, things might look a little different, but I can't imagine a scenario where this would justify implementing a faster GetHashCode().

share|improve this answer
2  
If you want to calculate Hash values od thousands of strings, you don't need to re-implement GetHashCode, just call the default GetHashCode on different threads for each string. –  Guillaume Oct 30 '09 at 15:37
    
True, but even if you had a thousand threads, you'd still want the basic code for the hashing to run as fast as you could make a sequential version of it run. –  Ira Baxter Oct 30 '09 at 20:19

Each step in the computation builds on the result of the previous step. If iterations of the loop run out of order, you will get a different result (the value of num from the previous iteration serves as input to the next iteration).

For that reason, any approach (multithreading, massively parallel execution on a GPU) that runs steps in parallel will generally skew the result.

Also, I would be surprised if the previously discussed loop unrolling is not already being done internally by the compiler to the extent that it actually makes a difference in execution time (compilers tend to be smarter than the average programmer these days, and loop unrolling has been around for a really long time as a compiler optimization technique).

share|improve this answer

Given that strings are immutable, the first thing that I would consider is caching the return result.

share|improve this answer
    
It takes memory and it's usefull only if GetHashCode is called multiple times on the same instance. –  Guillaume Oct 30 '09 at 15:39
    
The question was about speed, not memory use ;) –  Kent Boogaart Oct 30 '09 at 15:43
    
When we talk about primitive types, speed and memory are linked... But you are right, the question was only about speed of a particular algorithm. Anyway, it still helps only when GetHashCode is called multiple times on the same instance. –  Guillaume Oct 30 '09 at 15:52
    
To cache the result, you have to look up the result based on the argument. So you'll need to hash the argument to look up the cached answer... oops, that was the problem we were trying to avoid. I don't think you can reasonably do this. –  Ira Baxter Oct 30 '09 at 21:11
    
@Ira: er, there is no argument. The cache would be on the instance of the string. There is nothing to check except whether you've already calculated the result. if (_hashCode != 0) return _hashCode; –  Kent Boogaart Oct 30 '09 at 22:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.