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I am developing an "art gallery" app.

Feel free to pull down the source on github and play around with it.

Plunker with full source.

The current work around for getting Masonry to play nice with Angular:

.directive("masonry", function($parse) {
  return {
    restrict: 'AC',
    link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {
      elem.masonry({ itemSelector: '.masonry-brick'});
    }
  };     
})
.directive('masonryBrick', function ($compile) {
  return {
    restrict: 'AC',
    link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {
      scope.$watch('$index',function(v){
        elem.imagesLoaded(function () {
          elem.parents('.masonry').masonry('reload');
        });
      });
    }
  };    
});

This doesn't work well because:

  • As the content grows, so does the overhead of tiggering reload on the entire container.

The reload function:

  • Does not "append" items, rather re-arranges every item in the container.
  • Does work for triggering a reload when items are filtered out of a result set.

In context with the app I've given links to above, this problem becomes very easy to replicate.

I am looking for a solution that will use directives to leverage:

.masonry('appended', elem) and .masonry('prepended', elem)

Rather than executing .masonry('reload') every time.

.masonry('reload') for when elements are removed from result set.


EDIT

The project has been updated to use the working solution below.

Grab the source on GitHub

See a working version on Plunker

share|improve this question
    
Can you post your code in a plunker/jsfiddle? Would be easier to test. I'm having a hard time understanding your question; do you want to be able to choose whether new items are prepended or appended when getting added, without calling reload? Looking at the source for the Masonry adding items example page, it seems that they're triggering a reload when prepending items: $container.prepend($boxes).masonry('reload'); – GFoley83 May 12 '13 at 8:47
    
@GFoley83 Yes --- being able to control how items are added and when the container is reloaded without a hackish solution. Here is a plunker with full source: plnkr.co/akHTslTdRMvfe3KrnPeO . Good catch on the reload for .masonry('prepended', elem) --- hopefully that will be an easy one to implement. .masonry('appended', elem) however seems like it's going to be a real problem. – Dan Kanze May 13 '13 at 2:10
    
@DanKanze, I tried working version mentioned by you. but facing "Controller 'masonry', required by directive 'ngInit', can't be found!" issue. I have already registered 'wu.masonry'. Plz help – Amit Gupta May 8 '14 at 8:56
    
ohk got it its a angularjs bug – Amit Gupta May 8 '14 at 9:17

I've been playing around with this a bit more and @ganaraj's answer is pretty neat. If you stick a $element.masonry('resize'); in his controller's appendBrick method and account for the images loading then it looks like it works.

Here's a plunker fork with it in: http://plnkr.co/edit/8t41rRnLYfhOF9oAfSUA

The reason this is necessary is because the number of columns is only calculated when masonry is initialized on the element or the container is resized and at this point we haven't got any bricks so it defaults to a single column.

If you don't want to use the 'resize' method (I don't think it's documented) then you could just call $element.masonry() but that causes a re-layout so you'd want to only call it when the first brick is added.

Edit: I've updated the plunker above to only call resize when the list grows above 0 length and to do only one "reload" when multiple bricks are removed in the same $digest cycle.

Directive code is:

angular.module('myApp.directives', [])
  .directive("masonry", function($parse, $timeout) {
    return {
      restrict: 'AC',
      link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {
        elem.masonry({ itemSelector: '.masonry-brick'});
        // Opitonal Params, delimited in class name like:
        // class="masonry:70;"
        //elem.masonry({ itemSelector: '.masonry-item', columnWidth: 140, gutterWidth: $parse(attrs.masonry)(scope) });
      },
      controller : function($scope,$element){
          var bricks = [];
          this.appendBrick = function(child, brickId, waitForImage){
            function addBrick() {
              $element.masonry('appended', child, true);

              // If we don't have any bricks then we're going to want to 
              // resize when we add one.
              if (bricks.length === 0) {
                // Timeout here to allow for a potential
                // masonary timeout when appending (when animating
                // from the bottom)
                $timeout(function(){
                  $element.masonry('resize');  
                }, 2);  
              }

              // Store the brick id
              var index = bricks.indexOf(brickId);
              if (index === -1) {
                bricks.push(brickId);
              }
            }

            if (waitForImage) {
              child.imagesLoaded(addBrick);      
            } else {
              addBrick();
            }
          };

          // Removed bricks - we only want to call masonry.reload() once
          // if a whole batch of bricks have been removed though so push this
          // async.
          var willReload = false;
          function hasRemovedBrick() {
            if (!willReload) {
              willReload = true;
              $scope.$evalAsync(function(){
                willReload = false;
                $element.masonry("reload");
              });
            }
          }

          this.removeBrick = function(brickId){
              hasRemovedBrick();
              var index = bricks.indexOf(brickId);
              if (index != -1) {
                bricks.splice(index,1);
              }
          };
      }
    };     
  })
  .directive('masonryBrick', function ($compile) {
    return {
      restrict: 'AC',
      require : '^masonry',
      link: function (scope, elem, attrs, MasonryCtrl) {

      elem.imagesLoaded(function () {
        MasonryCtrl.appendBrick(elem, scope.$id, true);
      });

      scope.$on("$destroy",function(){
          MasonryCtrl.removeBrick(scope.$id);
      }); 
    }
  };
});
share|improve this answer
    
The way this works is exactly what I was looking for! I have a slight concern about calling resize() on every element. Calling $element.masonry() once after first element seems like it would be less overhead or no? I'm looking for whatever performs the best. – Dan Kanze May 19 '13 at 19:45
    
I'm unsure really - you'd need to recheck the size (either byresize or masonry()) every time the number of bricks goes from 0 to 1. This would involve tracking the number of bricks in play which could be as simple as a counter increasing in addBricks and decreasing in removeBricks. But can you guarantee that they will only ever be called once for each brick? Other tracking may incur a penalty cost. In the end I went for resize because it is lightweight (does a few math operations and checks the first brick's width) and provides a simple, reliable solution. – James Sharp May 20 '13 at 8:12
    
I've updated the plunkr (plnkr.co/edit/8t41rRnLYfhOF9oAfSUA) to incorporate @g00fy's way of counting the bricks. If you want to use appended there's not much point in putting the $watch on bricks because you're going to have to do work on each individual brick anyway and you already know of new/old bricks from the masonry-brick directive. – James Sharp May 21 '13 at 16:27
    
I feel like using a mechanism to fail safe the resize() other than timeout() would be a final solution. I feel like the way he implimented a $watch was the price to pay to garentee the order of operations --- theres always a chance timeout() could fail, unless my understanding of timeout() is wrong of course :) ... Also, overhead of $watch is nothing compared to the overhead of triggering reload() on the DOM --- which was the original problem we were trying to solve. BTW --- heres +50 for being so available with your updates, as well as your solutions. – Dan Kanze May 21 '13 at 17:50
    
Thanks - I've been playing around a bit more but can't find a way to get rid of the $timeout completely (though it seems to make no difference how long the timeout is - you can get rid of the 2 and it still works). A single $timeout will run the full scope digest cycle and update the DOM which is basically what we are waiting for and what I suspect is implicitly happening with @g00fy's $watch – James Sharp May 21 '13 at 19:01

This is not exacly what you are looking for (prepend and append), but should be just what you are looking for:

http://plnkr.co/edit/dmuGHCNTCBBuYpjyKQ8E?p=preview

Your version of the directive triggers reload for every brick. This version triggers only reload only once for the whole list change.

The approach is very simple:

  1. Register new bricks in parent masonry controller
  2. $watch for changes in the registered bricks and fire masonry('reload')
  3. Remove brick from bricks registry when you are removing the element - $on('$destroy')
  4. ?
  5. Profit

You can extend this approach to do what you wanted (use prepend and append) but I don't see any reason why you would want to do that. This also would be much more complicated, since you would have to manually track the order of the elements. I also don't belive it would be any faster - on the contrary it may be slower, since you would have to trigger multiple append/prepend if your changes a lot of bricks.

I am not quite sure, but I guess you could use ng-animate for this (the JavaScript animation version)

We have implemented something similar for tiling events in our calendar app. This solution turned out to be the fastest. If anyone has better solution, I'd love to see that.

For those who want to se the code:

angular.module('myApp.directives', [])
  .directive("masonry", function($parse) {
    return {
      restrict: 'AC',
      controller:function($scope,$element){
        // register and unregister bricks
        var bricks = [];
        this.addBrick = function(brick){
          bricks.push(brick)
        }
        this.removeBrick = function(brick){
          var index = bricks.indexOf(brick);
          if(index!=-1)bricks.splice(index,1);
        }
        $scope.$watch(function(){
          return bricks
        },function(){
          // triggers only once per list change (not for each brick)
          console.log('reload');
          $element.masonry('reload');
        },true);
      },
      link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {
        elem.masonry({ itemSelector: '.masonry-brick'});
      }
    };     
  })
  .directive('masonryBrick', function ($compile) {
    return {
      restrict: 'AC',
      require:'^masonry',
      link: function (scope, elem, attrs,ctrl) {
        ctrl.addBrick(scope.$id);

        scope.$on('$destroy',function(){
          ctrl.removeBrick(scope.$id);
        });
      }
    };
  });

Edit: there is one thing I forgot about (loading images) - just call 'reload' when all images were loaded. Ill try to edit the code later.

share|improve this answer
    
Performance wise this is exactly what I'm looking for. The way the bricks rearrange themselves on every reload() though is a problem. If you look @JamesSharps answer he was able to leverage appended() and use a resize() event to compensate for DOM lag. Is it possible to modify this to use appended() on bricks to preserve ordering and trigger resize() at the end? That would be best of both worlds. – Dan Kanze May 20 '13 at 23:43
    
+1 for step 4 and 5 – Ahmad Alfy May 21 '13 at 8:43
    
I don't know much about masonry but I bet you just need to change the order of triggering those events. – g00fy May 21 '13 at 9:19
    
Could you slightly modify this to use appended() on each element rather than reload() on each new set of elements? – Dan Kanze May 21 '13 at 13:32
    
Sure, but since I don't know much about how masonry works, please explain in an ordered list what would you expect to happen and when (what events get triggered). Then I'll have no problem modifying the code. – g00fy May 22 '13 at 17:14

Hey I just made masonry directive for AngularJS that is far more simpler than most of the implementations I've seen. Check the gist out here: https://gist.github.com/CMCDragonkai/6191419

It's compatible with AMD. Requires jQuery, imagesLoaded and lodash. Works with dynamic amount of items, AJAX loaded items (even with initial items), window resizing, and custom options. Prepended items, appended items, reloaded items... etc. 73 lines!

Here's a plunkr showing it work: http://plnkr.co/edit/ZuSrSh?p=preview (without AMD, but the same code).

share|improve this answer

One of the least documented feature of Angular is its Directive Controllers ( though it is on the front page of www.angularjs.org - Tabs ).

Here is a modified plunker that makes use of this mechanism.

http://plnkr.co/edit/NmV3m6DZFSpIkQOAjRRE

People do use Directive Controllers but it has been used ( and abused ) for things it probably was not meant for.

In the plunker above I have only modified the directives.js file. Directive controllers are a mechanism for communication between directives. Sometimes , it is not sufficient / easy to do everything in one directive. In this case, you have already created two directives but the right way to make them interact is through a directive controller.

I was not able to figure out when you wanted to prepend and when you wanted to append. I have only implemented "append" currently.

Also on a side note : If resources doesnt already implement promises, you can implement them yourself. It isnt really hard to do that. I noticed you are using a callback mechanism (which I wouldnt recommend ). You have already put in promises there but still you are using callbacks which I was not able to understand why.

Does this provide a proper solution to your problem ?

For documentation see http://docs.angularjs.org/guide/directive > Directive Definition Object > controller.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry mate but the plunker youve forked doesnt append items properly. That is --- they stack in a line one after another ;/ ... They self correct after masonrys "resize event triggers". If you need context for how I would like them to be used in the app, you are doing it correctly. appended should be for any new items, reload should be for when any items are removed. prepended it seems like the reload masonry chains after calling will self correct stacking issue. As for the callback chaining --- I'm a total noob, this is more of a learning project for me. – Dan Kanze May 15 '13 at 13:39
    
I've made some significant changes too the original plunker based off your recommendations. Things are a lot cleaner now if that makes it easier for you to work with. – Dan Kanze May 16 '13 at 17:46
    
@DanKanze where are your changes? – ganaraj May 16 '13 at 18:53
    
Controllers/Services. – Dan Kanze May 16 '13 at 19:02

I believe that I have had exactly the same problem:

Many images in a ng-repeat loop, and want to apply masonry/isotope to them when they are loaded and ready.

The issue is that even after imagesLoaded is called back there is a period of time when the images are not 'complete', and so can not be measured and layed out properly.

I have come up with the following solution that works for me and only requires one layout pass. It occurs in three stages

  1. Wait for images to load (when the last one is added from the loop - uses the jQuery images loaded plugin).
  2. Wait for all images to 'complete'
  3. Layout the images.

angularApp.directive('checkLast', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        compile: function (element, attributes) {
            return function postLink(scope, element) {
                if (scope.$last === true) {
                    $('#imagesHolder').imagesLoaded(function () {
                        waitForRender();
                    });
                }
            }
        }
    }
});

function waitForRender() {
    //
    // We have to wait for every image to be ready before we can lay them out
    //
    var ready = true;
    var images = $('#imagesHolder').find('img');
    $.each(images,function(index,img) {
        if ( !img.complete ) {
            setTimeout(waitForRender);
            ready = false;
            return false;
        }
    });
    if (ready) {
        layoutImages();
    }
}

function layoutImages() {
    $('#imagesHolder').isotope({
        itemSelector: '.imageHolder',
        layoutMode: 'fitRows'
    });
}

This works with layout like this

<div id="imagesHolder">
    <div class="imageHolder"
         check-last
         ng-repeat="image in images.image"
        <img ng-src="{{image.url}}"/>
    </div>
</div>

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Rather than using two directives you could incorporate them both into one directive. Something like:

.directive("masonry", function($timeout) {
    return {
        restrict: 'AC',
        template: '<div class="masonry-brick" ng-repeat="image in pool | filter:{pool:true}">' +
                        '<span>{{image.albumTitle|truncate}}</span>' +
                        '<img ng-src="{{image.link|imageSize:t}}"/>' +
                  '</div>',
        scope: {
            pool: "="
        },
        link: function(scope, elem, attrs){
            elem.masonry({itemSelector: '.masonry-brick'});

            // When the pool changes put all your logic in for working out what needs to be prepended
            // appended etc
            function poolChanged(pool) {

                //... Do some logic here working out what needs to be appended, 
                // prepended...

                // Make sure the DOM has updated before continuing by doing a $timeout
                $timeout(function(){
                    var bricks = elem.find('.masonry-brick');
                    brick.imagesLoaded(function() {
                        // ... Do the actual prepending/appending ...
                    });
                });
            }

            // Watch for changes to the pool
            scope.$watch('pool', poolChanged, true); // The final true compares for 
                                                     // equality rather than reference
        }
    }
});

and html usage:

<div class="masonry" pool="pool"></div>
share|improve this answer
1  
Could you throw this up on a plunker fork to test? The underlying problem here is that appended event's arent triggering because of DOM ready state. I've tried similiar approaches in the past without success :/ . Also, I would much rather prefer templates to be in a partial rather then injected (way cleaner). – Dan Kanze May 16 '13 at 13:40

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