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A string variable is defined clause1 = "((1 & z[0]) != 0)"

Its eval() gives BoolRef: 1 & v__a != 0 while I actually need BoolRef: ((1 & v__a) != 0)

How to keep the brackets in eval() and evaluate everything else

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Have you tried escaping the brackets, i.e. \[ and \]? –  kirbyfan64sos May 12 '13 at 5:34
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What version of python is this? –  Snakes and Coffee May 12 '13 at 5:41
    
Do you mean replacing ( and ) by \( and \) respectively. I tried this and got error as File "<string>", line 1 \(\(1 & z[0]\) != 0\) ^ SyntaxError: unexpected character after line continuation character –  Sharad May 12 '13 at 5:43
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I tried these in python 2.7 and it seems to work fine... >>> clause1 = "((1 & z[0]) != 0)" >>> z =[1, 2, 3] >>> eval(clause1) –  Anthony Kong May 12 '13 at 5:45
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Where did you get the "BoolRef" result from? –  Dek Dekku May 12 '13 at 6:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you're confusing eval() with the exact type of z[0], which is, I guess, what does the magic here. I believe that if you try to run ((1 & z[0]) != 0) directly, without eval(), you'd get the same answer BoolRef: 1 & v__a != 0. Am I correct? If so, then you need to look in the class BoolRef to fix how it implements __repr__(), to include some extra parenthesis in the final string.

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You are right. I am getting BoolRef: 1 & v__a != 0 when I am assigning it to a variable without eval() Now I have to figure out how to deal with it. Thanks!! –  Sharad May 12 '13 at 18:29

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