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So, I understand what the following code does and why it works, but it seems like there should be a different way to do this:

my @squares = map { $_ > 5 ? ($_ * $_) : () } @numbers;

Is there a way that we can essentially say:

my @squares = map { if ($_ > 5) then ($_ * $_) } @numbers;

Or do we have to have "rule" for every entry, ie else return ()?

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EXPR?EXPR:EXPR is called the conditional operator. It's not the ternary operator; it's merely a ternary operator among others. Fixed title. –  ikegami May 12 '13 at 12:30
    
Oh, thank you, I didn't know that. –  Steve P. May 12 '13 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

amon gave you lots of info, but didn't actually answer the question. The equivalent of

map { $_ > 5 ? ($_ * $_) : () }

using if instead of the conditional operator is

map { if ($_ > 5) { $_ * $_ } else { () } }

It's impossible for the map expression not to return a value. It returns the last expression evaluated. If you remove the else clause, that expression is the comparison, so it would similar to if you did

map { if ($_ > 5) { $_ * $_ } else { $_ > 5 } }

though $_ > 5 only gets executed once, so I guess it's closer to

map { ($_ > 5) && ($_ * $_) }

So yes, you do have to have a rule for every entry, in the sense that it's impossible not to.

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For this to work, the map block has to return the empty list for unwanted items. While the code yould be rewritten with grep,

my @squares = map { $_**2 } grep { $_ > 5 } @numbers;

this looses a lot of elegance.

If we do not specify an else return value, the if seems to implicitly pass on the false value:

say $_+0 for map{ if($_>5){$_**2} } 3..7;
# 0
# 0
# 0
# 36
# 49

which is useless for our purpose.

But we can always write a filtering map that returns the value of our block, or the empty list if it was false:

sub mapgrep (&@) {
  my $cb = shift;
  map { local $_ = $_; $cb->($_) || () } @_;
}

my @squares = mapgrep { $_**2 if $_ > 5 } @numbers;

However, this relies on the side effect that a conditional returns the value of the condition if this state is not otherwise handled. I can't see where this is explicitly documented.

(Note: Perl does not have a keyword then).

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Thanks. I know there's no then, I was using pseudo-code. Just wondering, if I wrote the above subroutine, I would just write: sub mapgrep instead of sub mapgrep (&@). Is what I'm doing looked down upon? –  Steve P. May 12 '13 at 6:53
1  
@SteveP. For most purposes, prototypes are evil. They change the way the sub invocation is parsed, and are primarily meant to impose context on the arguments, often leading to unexpected behaviour. However, the &@ allows us to write a map-like subroutine by emitting sub from the block. Without the prototype, it would have been mapgrep sub { ... }, @numbers. –  amon May 12 '13 at 6:56
    
Thanks, one more thing: when I looked at my @squares = map { $_**2 } grep { $_ > 5 } @numbers;, I originally thought it should be written as: my @squares = grep { $_ > 5 } map { $_**2 } @numbers;. I kinda rationalized why your way is correct, but I tried to switch the order anyway to see what would happen. For my @numbers = (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9);, the output was "unexpected": 9 16 ... 81 What's going on here? –  Steve P. May 12 '13 at 7:00
    
@Steve P.: The value of $_ in the grep or map block refers to each input in turn to the block, which comes from the list on its immediate right. So if you swap the order, the grep { $_ > 5 } is filtering the already-squared numbers. 9 is the first square number over 5. –  Neil Slater May 12 '13 at 7:19
    
Ah, that makes perfect sense. Thank you both. –  Steve P. May 12 '13 at 7:30

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