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I have to write a pl/sql code(actually a function) which returns a postcode when by taking the suburb as its parameter the code is like this:

create or replace 
FUNCTION get_postCode(p_suburb IN varchar2)
RETURN varchar2 
IS
--
v_postcode varchar2;
--
CURSOR c1 IS 
SELECT locality, postcode FROM table_postcode;
--
BEGIN
--
FOR r1 IN c1 
loop
    IF upper(r1.locality) = upper(p_suburb)
    THEN 
      v_postcode := r1.postcode;
      return v_postcode;
    END IF;
exit WHEN c1%notfound;
END loop;
-- return v_postcode;
--
exception WHEN others then
v_postcode := null;  
END; 

the table_postcode was obtained from Post Office an it contains the suburbs(locality as column in the talble) and postcode and other fields that are not relevant to this case.

when I use the function it is return correct value and when I use this function as on of the columns of the SELECT clause it return ONLY if I don't add any further clauses after FROM clause. It is quit strange for me.

the situation is :

select street, suburb, get_postcode(suburb) from my_table;

the line above gives me the result but

select street, subur, get_postcode(suburb) from my_table order by suburb;

fails and gives me the following error message:

ORA-06503: PL/SQL: Function returned without value
ORA-06512: at "U11254683.GET_POSTCODE", line 25
06503. 00000 -  "PL/SQL: Function returned without value"
*Cause:    A call to PL/SQL function completed, but no RETURN statement was
       executed.
*Action:   Rewrite PL/SQL function, making sure that it always returns
       a value of a proper type.

if I call the function in a block like:

Declare
v_post varchar2(10);
Begin
v_post := get_postcode('Sydney');
DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('The post code is '||v_post);
End;

result is correct and gives me 2000.

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you using a cursor? –  Mark Bannister May 12 '13 at 7:53
    
to go through the table and check the suburb matching and get the postcode, am I doing it wrong? or... –  Dilshat Abduwalli May 12 '13 at 8:01
2  
Short answer: yes - SQL is a set-based language and is best used for set-based operations. See hol's answer for a better approach to using functions. –  Mark Bannister May 12 '13 at 8:19
    
thanks, a good lesson for beginners –  Dilshat Abduwalli May 12 '13 at 8:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should return something when nothing is found. Before exception comment in the statement

return v_postcode;

The way your routine is written it may does find nothing and then hits the end of the function without returning anything, hence the error "function returned without value". It is literally exactly this.

However, you can do this much easier by directly selecting on the suburb. But what would you do if you get more than one postcode to suburb (if this is possible)?

create or replace FUNCTION get_postCode(i_suburb IN varchar2)
RETURN varchar2 
IS
  l_postcode varchar2;
BEGIN
  select postcode 
    into l_postcode
   where upper(i_suburb) = upper(locality);
-- 
  return l_postcode;
exception 
  WHEN others then
    return null;  
END; 

In this version you would get null if one suburb exists in more than one postcode. It is now up to your design decision how to handle that situation. You could then handle it in the exception

exception
   when TOO_MANY_ROWS then
        return '**Error** Several Values'; -- do something meaningful here 
   when NO_DATA_FOUND then
        return null; -- if you want to return null on nothing found
share|improve this answer
    
THANKS FOR YOUR ADVICE. I HAVE TRIED YOUR CODE, AND INDEED I HAD THE ISSUE WITH THE TOO MANY ROWS ERROR WHICH IS NOW BEING HANDLED IN EXCEPTION –  Dilshat Abduwalli May 12 '13 at 8:17
    
@DilshatAbduwalli: STOP SHOUTING AT US –  a_horse_with_no_name May 12 '13 at 8:39
    
@a_horse_with_no_name I thought the same, but not everybody knows that uppercase means shouting. In this case I interpreted it not as shouting. Actually is there a Stackoverflow rule that uppercase means shouting or is this from the general web ethnic? –  hol May 12 '13 at 8:43
    
@hol: uppercase is considered shouting in any "online" conversation (forum, mails, newsgroups, ...) as far as I know. –  a_horse_with_no_name May 12 '13 at 9:17
    
@a_horse_with_no_name Also as far as I know, but more than once I observed that this is no (more) common knowledge :-) And since then I interprete it good or bad depending on the context. –  hol May 12 '13 at 9:46

Try this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_postCode
(p_suburb IN varchar2)
RETURN varchar2 
IS
    v_postcode varchar2;
    CURSOR c1 IS 
        SELECT locality, postcode FROM table_postcode;
BEGIN
    FOR r1 IN c1 LOOP
        EXIT WHEN c1%notfound;
        IF upper(r1.locality) = upper(p_suburb) THEN 
          v_postcode := r1.postcode;
          EXIT;
        END IF;
    END LOOP;
    return v_postcode;
    exception WHEN others then
    return null;  
END; 
/

By exiting the FOR loop on finding out the first post code you are ensuring that there is not a TOO_MANY_ROWS exception raised. Also, by putting the return outside the IF statement you are ensuring that atleast a NULL is returned in case nothing is found.

share|improve this answer
    
In your code it still does not work, because after the exception it will not return to the code (where it got the exception) and still no return statement is hit. –  hol May 12 '13 at 8:44
    
Well, a similar code works perfectly for me on my machine! :D –  Rachcha May 12 '13 at 9:07
    
I meant if any exception happens (more unlikely how it is coded now) it will go to the exception and then does not return anything. –  hol May 12 '13 at 9:10
    
@hol: Yes, you're right. I should put a return null in the exception block. Editing. –  Rachcha May 12 '13 at 9:13
    
Though, I believe it is less likely that I will get a NO_DATA_FOUND or TOO_MANY_ROWS exception now. –  Rachcha May 12 '13 at 9:13

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